Bluebarb Pie Recipe

The best bluebarb pie—that is, blueberry and rhubarb pie—we’ve ever experienced, this melds tart with sweet to create some serious summer pie envy among strawberry rhubarb loyalists.

Bluebarb Pie Recipe

This bluebarb pie is simply a mash-up of blueberry pie and rhubarb pie and, quite frankly, we’re wondering why the combination isn’t more common seeing as it tastes so uncannily intuitive. Based on how folks are raving about this recipe, it’s giving strawberry rhubarb pie a run for its popularity.–Renee Schettler Rossi

Special Equipment: Pie weights or uncooked beans or rice

Bluebarb Pie Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 30 M
  • 3 H
  • Makes one 9-inch pie


  • For the crust
  • 1/2 recipe Lard and Butter Pie Crust, chilled for at least several hours
  • For the crumble topping
  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces or 90 g) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt or kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon (3 g) ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup (1 3/4 ounces or 55 g) granulated sugar (or more to taste if your blueberries are unusually tart)
  • 6 tablespoons (3 ounces or 85 g) unsalted butter, cold, cut into small chunks
  • 1/4 cup (1 ounce or 30 g) walnuts, chopped
  • For the bluebarb filling
  • 1 cup (4 1/2 ounces or 125 g) fresh blueberries
  • 2 cups (7 3/4 ounces or 220 g) chopped rhubarb
  • 1/3 cup (2 ounces or 50 g) dried blueberries (optional)
  • 1/4 cup (1 3/4 ounces or 55 g) granulated sugar
  • Softly whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, for serving (optional)


  • Make the crust
  • 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).
  • 2. Roll out the chilled pastry and line a 9-inch pie dish with it. Prick the pastry all over with a fork. Cut a piece of parchment paper about twice the size of your pie dish, crumple it, uncrumple it, and place it in the pastry-lined dish with a generous handful of pie weights or uncooked beans or rice. Bake the pastry for 10 minutes, then remove the parchment and baking beans or rice and bake for 5 minutes more. Remove from the oven but leave the oven on.
  • Make the crumble topping
  • 3. In a bowl, combine the flour, salt, cinnamon, and the sugar. Add the butter and mix it with your fingertips until a crumbly mixture forms. Mix the chopped walnuts into this crumbly mixture.
  • Make the bluebarb filling
  • 4. In a large bowl, stir together the fresh blueberries, rhubarb, and dried blueberries (if using) along with the sugar and 3 tablespoons of the crumble mixture. (Mixing some of the crumble mixture into the filling helps absorb the rhubarb’s plentiful juices and imparts a touch of buttery gooeyness to the fruit.)
  • 5. Pour the filling into the pre-baked pie crust and smooth it into an even layer. Place it on a rimmed baking sheet lined with aluminum foil and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven and cover the fruit filling with the remaining crumble mixture. Return the pie to the oven and bake until the filling is bubbling and the crumble topping is golden brown, about 20 minutes.
  • 6. Wait just a few minutes before slicing and serving so the filling isn’t scalding hot. If desired, top with softly whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.
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Recipe Testers Reviews

Recipe Testers Reviews
Testers Choice
Dawn E.

May 22, 2016

This bluebarb pie recipe will make any pie lover happy, whether served warm or with ice cream or even as breakfast. The recipe is extremely easy to assemble and is one of the best-tasting pies I can remember making in a long while. This was my first attempt at using fresh rhubarb and it will not be my last. The pie was not overly sweet. It actually had the perfect balance of sweetness and tartness. The rhubarb, which I thought would be tart, was barely detectable and paired beautifully with the blueberries and the crumble. The fruit filling had a pleasant, cooked-down, almost jam-like texture and the crumble was decadent with just the right sweetness and crunch and an almost undetectable hint of cinnamon. I was in sort of a time crunch to make this pie so when I was at the store picking up ingredients I bought a 2-pack of 9-inch frozen pie shells and doubled the recipe to make 2 pies. I would recommend using a shallow versus a deep dish pie plate for this recipe. In the end, when the pie is baked and the fruit is cooked down, the ratio of fruit to crumble is about equal. (I imagine if you wanted more fruit you could always double the fruit mixture but keep the crumble the same and use a deeper pie dish and longer cooking time.) After I added the crumble, the pie took another 23 minutes for the topping to reach a golden brown. I saw the fruit juices bubbling and I knew it was ready to pull out of the oven. The pie was not liquidy at all and needed very little cooling time, if any, before serving. The family I delivered the warm pie to was extremely grateful and raved about how much they enjoyed it. My husband also really enjoyed the pie warm with ice cream and also at room temperature for breakfast with coffee. One of the best pies I have ever tasted. This recipe is a gem!

Testers Choice
Virginia L.

May 22, 2016

This bluebarb pie was delicious. It's a perfect combination of sweet and tart. I used the dried blueberries, which added another dimension to the flavor. Unlike traditional rhubarb pie, this pie was not soupy at all. The filling set up perfectly. The baking time was perfect, too. I didn't need any visual clues, nor did I need to cover the edge of the crust to prevent excess browning. I let the pie cool completely before serving it.

Testers Choice
Helen Doberstein

May 22, 2016

This bluebarb pie will make a nice change from your standard strawberry rhubarb pie for summer. The pie is not overly sweet and the addition of the chopped nuts in the crumble was welcome. With the dried berries, the filling thickened nicely and the crumbly topping was nicely browned. The bottom crust didn't even get soggy. The pie was pretty much done after 35 minutes baking. Since we took the pie with us to a family dinner, it was allowed to cool completely and was served at room temperature with a softly whipped cream. The only thing I noticed is that the blueberry flavor did overshadow the rhubarb a bit. Verdict? It must have been good as only the pie plate made it home.

Testers Choice
Anna Scott

May 22, 2016

I adored the flavors in this bluebarb pie. I am immediately drawn to fruit pies, no matter what time of year it is, as fruit pies really highlight the ripest and best fruit of the season (not to mention they are easy to put together!). The fruit pairings you normally see with tasty spring rhubarb are raspberries or strawberries, but boy did I LOVE the combination here with blueberries. The touch of ground cinnamon was lovely for a touch of warmth, and yes, I did use the 1/3 cup dried wild blueberries. The dried fruit really did add a pop of blueberry flavor that was really intense. The timing of the pie in the oven was perfect; it achieved a nice, flaky, lightly browned crust without me having to cover it with foil at any point and the fruit was bubbly and the rhubarb tender. I served my pie warm with a dollop of mascarpone cheese.

  1. Christine A. says:

    This pie looks great. I was wondering if anyone has made this using frozen blueberries and frozen rhubarb and if anything in the recipe needed to be adjusted? Thanks!

    • Beth Price says:

      HI Christine, we tested the recipe using fresh fruits as opposed to frozen. Perhaps some of our readers have tried it with frozen? I do know that often times when I use frozen fruits in baking, tossing them with a bit of flour helps to reduce oozing and adds a bit of thickness.

      • Terese Swearingen says:

        Frozen fruit works well. It baked and set up just fine. I did find overall that the filling was too tart and I generally do not care for sweet. I will try again with a bit more sugar in the filling.

        • Renee Schettler Rossi says:

          Thanks so much for letting us know, Terese. Glad you’ll make it again. I do find that there’s tremendous variability in the sweetness of both rhubarb and blueberries, so yes, sugar as needed.

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