Herb Salt Recipe

Herb salt is, quite simply, herbs pummeled with salt to create a restaurant worthy condiment. Here’s how to make it along with several incredible uses, whether fancy schmancy or simple, cocktails or chicken. 

Herb Salt Recipe

Knowing how to make herb salt is as simple as chopping that stash of leftover herbs in the fridge that you don’t have any use for and mixing them with salt. What results lends an incredibly complex taste to just about anything. We’re talking so many possible uses that are restaurant worthy, folks. Use fresh sage, basil, thyme, rosemary, tarragon, or whatever herb you have an abundance of growing out back or have way too much of after Thanksgiving. Use it liberally and often to channel your inner fancy schmancy chef.–Angie Zoobkoff

How To Use Homemade Herb Salt
  • Adorn the rim of cocktails
  • Sprinkle it on baked potatoes
  • Dust it atop pork chops, steaks, chicken cutlets, and fish fillets
  • Pinch some atop sliced tomatoes
  • Incorporate into eggs
  • And so, so much more! Let us know in a comment below your uses for homemade herb salt.

Herb Salt Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 5 M
  • 5 M
  • Makes about 1 tablespoon

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons (6 grams) kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh sage, basil, thyme, rosemary, tarragon, or other herb)

Directions

  • 1. Blend the salt and the herb in a spice grinder or with a mortar and pestle until completely combined and the mixture is the same consistency throughout. [Editor’s Note: If you’re making this for a dinner party, you may want to double or even triple the amounts so as to have ample for guests. If you’re using a small mortar and pestle, you’ll need to mix the larger amount in small batches so as to properly pummel the herb into the salt.]
  • 2. That’s it. Use immediately or cover tightly and refrigerate for up to a couple days.
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Recipe Testers Reviews

Recipe Testers Reviews
Testers Choice
Anna Scott

Dec 06, 2016

Before testing this recipe for homemade herb salt, I was in the market and saw an entire section of gourmet herb salts for sale—the variety of flavors was expansive and impressive. Seeing these gourmet salts (with their gourmet prices), I began to think about how most people don't realize how easy they are to make at home. This is a great recipe that shows you just how easy the process is. I love sage with its strong earthy flavor that pairs wonderfully with meats, fish, and veggies, especially during fall. I used this round of sage salt on a simple side dish of roasted organic sweet potato rounds. Along with a drizzle of fruity olive oil, the green salt mixture was visually pretty on the orange sweet potatoes and tasted great as well. I would love to try this salt on grilled pork chops or maybe on a batch of crisp roasted chickpeas or maybe a baked white fish fillet. In terms of the recipe itself, I blended the two ingredients together in my mini-prep food processor for 30 seconds; at this point the mixture was homogeneous. I am excited to try this method with some other herbs I have on hand. Next I think I'll try dried lavender salt, and basil salt with some fresh basil from the garden.

Testers Choice
Sandy Hill

Dec 06, 2016

Sage salt is such a simple and versatile addition to foods! I used it on sliced tomatoes, grilled chicken, grilled pork chops, and sautéed fresh corn and peppers. Next time I'll be doubling the recipe! I can also see trying this with fresh thyme or rosemary. It was just a great little finishing salt for fresh vegetables and all grilled meats. Just change the herb for whatever is available in your herb garden.

Testers Choice
Sue Epstein

Dec 06, 2016

I used fresh basil rather than sage because basil is my favorite herb and I have pots of it growing on my kitchen window sills. (By the way, do you know that if you purchase a bunch of basil from the supermarket and keep it in a glass of water on your windowsill it will grow roots and continue to grow?) That said, I loved the idea of having basil salt ready to use and would highly recommend it for any herb that you use often and also recommend that you double the recipe. The recipe is pretty straightforward and couldn't be simpler. I used it to sprinkle on salads and on pasta with olive oil and basil salt. I don't know the storage life because I used all of mine in one day. I'd be interested in knowing how long it lasts being that the herbs are fresh but I would imagine that the salt acts as a preservative and prevents the herbs from rotting.

Testers Choice
Linda Christman

Dec 06, 2016

This homemade herb salt recipe is so versatile and easy and can be made in less than 5 minutes. I made it in a mortar and pestle with fresh sage. The result was a fine texture and a beautiful color. On tasting it, I thought it lacked a strong enough taste of sage, so I added a few more leaves, which was another teaspoon. It would also be great made with rosemary. I would suggest making a large amount as it can be used in so many dishes. I used mine as a rub for a pork loin roast. I also sprinkled it on mashed potatoes and roast chicken.

Testers Choice
Beth Price

Dec 06, 2016

This herb salt is the perfect addition to your recipe arsenal. I opted for basil and in less than 2 minutes my handy mortar and pestle created a restaurant-worthy salt. I sprinkled it on a warm salad of heirloom tomatoes and butter-poached lobster.

Testers Choice
Mackenzie Campbell

Dec 06, 2016

I think flavored salts are a great way to preserve fresh herbs and to very easily add flavor to a dish. They also make great gifts. They’re also versatile—I've used this herb salt on scrambled eggs, roasted vegetables, tomatoes, etc. It could be awesome to add a pinch to a cocktail! I'm thinking herb sugar would also be a similar process and worth a try for the holidays. My problem with this recipe might have stemmed from execution. I chopped the sage pretty finely and added it to my spice grinder with coarse kosher salt, thinking that the larger crystals would hold some sizable shaped during blending. In order to get everything sufficiently blended, I had to blitz it for much longer that I would have liked and my resulting salt, although tasty, was very fine and almost powdery. My solution is to hand chop the herb as finely as possible before mixing with the salt and to pulse the mixture just a few times before hand mixing to incorporate. I would hope that that would maintain the integrity of the salt crystals, and blend in the sage well. Another alternative would be to blend the sage with just some of the salt first to get it started and then add the rest so that the majority of the salt wouldn't get overworked while trying to fully blend in the herb.

Comments
Comments
  1. dan matchik says:

    Why couldn’t the fresh herbs be sun dried (or dried another way) and then mixed with salt—should last indefinitely if kept away from moisture or contaminants.

    • Renee Schettler Rossi says:

      Dan, I like the way you’re thinking. We haven’t tried that ourselves so I’m a little hesitant to recommend it just because we haven’t tried it. It should work. My only caveat is, as you mention, it’s important that the herbs be completely dry so as not to bring bacteria to the herb salt.

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