Pork Brine

It’s almost always a good idea to brine pork. Brining makes it flavorful and keeps it juicy. This particular recipe is distinguished by its use of garlic and rosemary, but you can flavor it with almost anything. The amount of brine below is ideal for up to 4 pounds of pork.–Thomas Keller

LC Just Do As The Man Says Note

It may seem sorta silly to heat the brine for just a minute, as the recipe below stipulates, but chef Thomas Keller knows what he’s doing. Not only does the heat facilitate the dissolving of the salt and honey, it draws out the essential oils of the herbs, which, in turn, equates to flavor. Lots of flavor. And not flavor in an overwhelming way. Just in a nicely complementary way. You know how back in the day when gentlemen would walk down the street and, when they encountered an acquaintance, they’d offer one another a slight head bow and lift of the hat as they said “Good day”? That’s how nicely and politely the flavors play with one another. Anyways, we diverge. Just do as the man says.

Pork Brine Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 10 M
  • 20 M
  • Makes 2 quarts

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons honey
  • 12 bay leaves
  • 3 large rosemary sprigs
  • 1/2 bunch thyme
  • 1/2 bunch flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 cup garlic cloves, crushed, skin left on
  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 1 cup (5 ounces) kosher salt, preferably Diamond Crystal
  • 8 cups water

Directions

  • 1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large pot, cover, and bring to a boil. Heat for 1 minute, stirring to dissolve the salt.
  • 2. Remove from the heat and cool completely. Chill before using.

Note

  • The brine can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.
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Comments
Comments
  1. Testers Choice Testers Choice says:

    [Brenda Carleton] I regularly brine pork and enjoy experimenting with different brine flavors. As the salt content of this was a touch high, I brined two pork tenderloins for six hours and discovered upon cooking that any longer would have been too long. At that point, they were perfectly seasoned, but from experience, I know how brines act. Most brines I make contain white or brown sugar or maple syrup, but this one contains honey as well as a lot of garlic, fresh herbs (including rosemary) and peppercorns. I served the pork with an apricot glaze that married nicely with the brine (tasting the pork both with the glaze and without). The brine announced itself loud and clear. It would be tasty with chicken parts, too.

  2. Chef d says:

    It should be 1 cup of salt to 1 gallon or 16 cups of water.

    • David Leite says:

      Hey Chef d, we checked and doubled checked then checked in with Keller’s people, and it is indeed 1 cup of salt to 8 cups of water. But the recipe is used for his Pork Belly Confit, which is brined for only 10 hours.

  3. WSJevons says:

    I just weighed out the the salt and 5 ounces of Mortons Kosher is ~ 1/2 cup.

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