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Homemade Marshmallows

Grilling marshmallows may have been the only thing I enjoyed about summer camp. They came in wax-paper–wrapped boxes and then, later, in bags with “jet-puffed” printed on them, but they were always a mystery. What was this white, spongy stuff, and why didn’t any mom know how to make it?

Well, we know now. Make these marshmallows and grill them at the end of a barbecue, toast them around a campfire, add them to s’mores, or just dip in the Fabulous Hot Fudge Sauce from the Malted Milk Ball Sundae.–David Leite

LC One Other Way To Indulge In Marshmallows Note

There’s one other very compelling way to indulge in marshmallows that David failed to mention above, and that’s straight up. C’mon, you know who you are, those of you who’d run around the house or the campground with one arm buried elbow deep in the bag of marshmallows, the other arm clutching the bag close to your chest, hands and lips and face sticky from smudged sweetness. It’s okay. We understand.

Homemade Marshmallows Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 50 M
  • 50 M
  • Makes 80 small marshmallows

Ingredients

  • Oil, for greasing the pan and the knife or pizza cutter
  • 1 cup confectioners’ sugar, plus extra for dusting
  • 1 3/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • Three 1/4-ounce envelopes unflavored gelatin
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • Drop of food coloring (optional)
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch

Directions

  • 1. Oil a 9-by-13-inch pan, sprinkle with a little confectioners’ sugar, and set aside. (A nonstick pan works especially well.)
  • 2. Combine the granulated sugar, 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons water, and the corn syrup in a medium saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil without stirring. Uncover, place a candy or deep-fry thermometer in the pan, and heat the syrup to 240°F (115°C), or the soft-ball stage. This will most likely take at least 15 minutes.
  • 3. When the syrup has started to boil, pour 1/2 cup water in the bowl of an electric mixer, sprinkle the gelatin over the surface, and stir well until the gelatin is completely wet. Let the gelatin soften at least 1 minute.
  • 4. Slowly pour the hot syrup into the gelatin in a steady stream, beating at low speed. Increase the speed to high and beat, frequently scraping the sides of the bowl. When the mixture turns white and begins to thicken, which ought to happen after about 10 minutes, add the vanilla extract. (If you prefer pretty pastel marshmallows, add a drop of any tint food coloring now.) Continue beating on high until the mixture is quite thick and then scrape it into prepared pan. Let cool completely, for 2 hours or more.
  • 5. Sift a little confectioners’ sugar over the top of the marshmallows and over a sheet of wax paper at least as large as the pan. Run a knife around all sides of the pan to loosen. Invert the pan onto the paper and pry out one corner with the knife until the rest follows. Dust what was formerly the bottom with more confectioners’ sugar.
  • 6. Combine the 1 cup of confectioners’ sugar with the cornstarch in a shallow bowl or pie plate.
  • 7. Oil a knife or pizza cutter and slice the marshmallow crosswise into 10 strips (or more or less depending on the size preferred). Cut 1 strip into 8 pieces (again, more or less to preference) and toss them in the confectioners’ sugar mixture to coat completely. Shake off excess in a sieve or colander and repeat with the remaining strips. (If you have leftover confectioners’ sugar mixture, store it in a sealed container and save it for your next batch of marshmallows.)
  • 8. Store in an airtight container or sealed plastic bag.
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