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Gluten-Free Multigrain Waffles

One of the ironies of going gluten-free is that you’ll be forced to start eating more whole grains than ever before in your life. Without enriched white flour, you have to turn to more interesting grains. Use these multigrain and gluten-free waffles will actually improve your health. And they taste like more than cardboard.

We both grew up eating Eggos waffles occasionally. If you miss the pop-and eat convenience, you can make up a big batch of these gluten-free waffles ahead of time and freeze them in airtight containers. Bingo—healthful toaster waffles!–Shauna James Ahern and Daniel Ahern

All About Teff Note

This recipe calls for several whole-grain flours, including teff. Teff flour is dark in color and has a taste almost like molasses. Originally from Ethiopia, teff is the smallest grain in the world and is packed with a nutritious wallop: one-quarter cup of whole grain teff has one-third of the iron you need for the day.—Shauna James Ahern and Daniel Ahern

Gluten-Free Multigrain Waffles Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 10 M
  • 1 H, 15 M
  • Makes 8 waffles

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces) tapioca flour
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) sorghum flour
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) certified gluten-free oat flour (or simply blitz gluten-free oats in a blender until they turn to a very fine powder)
  • 1/3 cup (1 ounce) teff flour
  • 2 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1/2 teaspoon guar gum
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • Walnut or canola oil or butter, for greasing the pan
  • Butter, good Vermont maple syrup, or a homemade fruit compote for serving

Directions

  • 1. Place the tapioca flour, sorghum flour, oat flour, and teff flour into a small bowl. Stir, then sift through a fine-mesh sieve into a larger bowl. Add the xanthan gum, guar gum, baking powder, salt, and sugar to the flours and combine.
  • 2. Place the milk, eggs, and vanilla in a small bowl and whisk together. Add the melted butter and stir again.
  • 3. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour in the liquids and stir until combined.
  • 4. Now, patience. Let the batter stand at room temperature for at least 1 hour before making the waffles. For best results, make the batter the night before you intend to make waffles and refrigerate it overnight.
  • 5. Turn on the waffle iron. When it has come to heat, brush both surfaces of the waffle iron with oil or butter. We like walnut oil. Pour about 1/3 cup of the waffle batter onto the waffle iron. Cook until the waffle is well browned. Serve immediately with whatever accoutrement(s) you please. Repeat with the remaining batter.

Variations for other allergies

  • Play with other whole-grain flours for this mix—that’s what we do each time we make this recipe—but keep the potato starch and sweet rice flour so the mix remains light. If you don’t tolerate dairy, you can make these buttermilk-style by adding 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to soy or rice milk and letting it stand for 15 minutes before using, and use extra oil in place of the butter.
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