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Delmonico Steak

This is, to us at Delmonico’s, the one and only Delmonico steak. We use a boneless, 20-ounce, prime rib eye steak that’s been aged for at least 6 weeks. Extremely tender yet unbelievably flavorful, this steak is cut from the center of the rib section. To finish it, we top the sizzling steak with a bit of what we call “meat butter,” a herbaceous compound butter that’s easy to make and simple to keep on hand.–Judith Choate and James Canora

LC Fire! Note

Okay, let’s talk fire. As in, the fire beneath the skillet in which you sear this lovely steak. As the authors explain, “Because fires vary in degree of heat, it’s difficult to estimate the length of time it will take a steak to cook. Since restaurant stoves are so much hotter than those in most homes, we’ve given instructions for grilling on a gas grill heated to medium-hot.” The idea being that you can attain higher temperatures on a grill than you can on a standard stovetop. At home you can grill a steak on the stovetop using a heavy-duty grill pan (the authors’ suggestion) or a cast-iron skillet (our suggestion). “It makes a mess of the stovetop because the grease splatters, but it cooks a pretty good steak,” cede the authors. Agreed.

Delmonico Steak Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 20 M
  • 25 M
  • Serves 6

Ingredients

  • For the meat butter
  • 3 fresh bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt
  • 1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • For the steak
  • Six 20-ounce prime rib eye steaks, at room temperature
  • Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Directions

  • Make the meat butter
  • 1. Combine the bay leaves, thyme, and salt in a spice grinder and process until powdery.
  • 2. Place the butter in a large bowl. Add the powdered herb mixture and, using a hand­held electric mixer or a wooden spoon, blend well. Scrape the butter mixture onto the center of a sheet of plastic wrap. Pull the wrap up and over the soft butter and, using your hands, form the butter into a roll about 1 1/4 inches in diameter. Wrap tightly and refrigerate for up to 1 week or tuck in a resealable plastic bag, label, date, and freeze for up to 3 months. When ready to serve, unwrap the flavored butter and, using a sharp knife, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices, allowing one slice per steak.
  • Make the steak
  • 3. Preheat the grill on medium-high or place a grill pan or cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking.
  • 4. Wipe any excess moisture from the steaks with a paper towel. Season the top with salt and pepper.
  • 5. Place the steaks on the hot grill, seasoned side down. Grill for 3 minutes. Season the top side with salt and pepper and, using tongs, turn the steaks and grill for 3 minutes.
  • 6. Remove the steaks from the grill and, using a clean brush, lightly coat both sides of each steak with olive oil. Return the steaks to the grill and cook, turning occasionally, until the exterior is nicely charred and the interior has reached the desired degree of doneness on an instant-read thermometer. (Rare steak will have an internal temperature of 120° to 125°F (48° to 52°C) and medium-rare to medium should read 130° to 150°F (54° to 65°C). This should take somewhere near 20 minutes, depending upon the thickness of the meat and the precise heat. Above 150°F (65°C), a steak is considered well-done, which is not a desirable temperature for a really good steak.
  • 7. Remove the steaks from the grill and let rest for 5 minutes. Top each steak with a generous pat of herb butter.

T-shirt Variation

  • Everyday Delmonico Steak
  • ​We’re all for steak on special occasions. We’re also all for steak on everyday occasions, which is why we often ignore the part of the ingredient list that specifies “6 20-ounce prime rib eye steaks.” (C’mon, web editors don’t make THAT much money!) We simply buy somewhat smaller steaks, or fewer bigger steaks, and adjust the time in the skillet accordingly.
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