Hanukkah Jelly Doughnuts | Sufganiyot

Hanukkah Jelly Doughnuts | Sufganiyot Recipe

Sufganiyot, or Hanukkah jelly doughnuts, are a favorite treat in Israel and a sweet alternative to the traditional Hanukkah latkes or potato pancakes. No one ever says no to doughnuts, and this two-bite version fits any appetite perfectly. The dough can be refrigerated overnight, so the doughnuts are easy to prepare in advance. I generally make a double batch (I make it in the bread machine), refrigerate the dough, and pinch off portions as needed for fresh treats or for taking along to a Hanukkah celebration. You can sprinkle sugar over the doughnuts or fill them with jelly, as is more traditional.–Marcy Goldman

LC Easy Way Out, Er, In Note

We were intrigued by the rather unconventional approach that the genius behind this recipe uses to “fill” the doughnuts with jelly. Marcy Goldman fries small blobs of dough and then simply makes a little indent on top and fills it with a dollop of jelly, much as one would with a thumbprint cookie. If you’re more for tradition, you can instead roll the dough to a thickness of 1/8 inch, cut out 2-inch circles using cookie cutters or a glass, sandwich the circles together around 1/2 teaspoon of jam, and then let the dough stand for 20 to 30 minutes before frying as directed below. Although sometimes, the author confesses, she doesn’t fill them at all.

Hanukkah Jelly Doughnuts | Sufganiyot Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 40 M
  • 45 M
  • Makes 12 to 18 sufganiyot

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 5 teaspoons dry yeast
  • 1/3 cup plus a pinch granulated sugar
  • 1 cup warm milk or water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil or melted vegetable shortening
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 1/4 to 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • Vegetable oil, for frying
  • 2 cups jam or jelly of your choice, at room temperature
  • Granulated or confectioners’ sugar, for dusting, if desired

Directions

  • 1. To make the sufganiyot, stir together the warm water, yeast, and the pinch of sugar in a large bowl. Allow the mixture to stand for a couple of minutes to allow the yeast to swell. Stir in the remaining sugar, the milk, vanilla, eggs, oil or shortening, salt, and as much of the flour as needed to create a soft dough. Knead the dough by hand or use the dough hook on a standing mixer, adding more flour as needed to form a firm dough that is smooth and elastic.
  • 2. Place the dough in a greased bowl and cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise for about 1 hour. (If not using right away, you can refrigerate the dough at this point.)
  • 3. Gently deflate the dough. (If the dough is coming out of the fridge, allow it to warm up at room temperature for about 40 minutes before punching and proceeding.)
  • 4. Pinch off golf ball-size pieces of dough and form them into small balls. Cover the sufganiyot with a clean tea towel and let them sit at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes.
  • 5. When you’re ready to fry, heat about 4 inches of oil in a deep fryer or a heavy Dutch oven to about 385°F (196°C). Line a baking sheet with a couple layers of paper towels.
  • 6. Gently press the sufganiyot to flatten them ever so slightly. To test the temperature of the oil, it’s a good idea to start out frying a single doughnut. When the doughnut appears golden brown on both sides, take it out and cut it open to see if the inside is cooked through. You want to attain and maintain an oil temperature that’s hot enough so it bubbles but not so hot that the doughnut browns before the center is cooked. It may take a few tries to find the right temperature and timing. When you’re satisfied that the oil is at a good temperature, carefully add the sufganiyot, 3 or 4 at a time, to the hot oil and fry until the undersides are deep brown. Turn over once and finish frying the other side. The total frying time will be somewhere between 1 1/2 and 3 minutes. Lift the sufganiyot out with a slotted spoon and drain them well on paper towels.
  • 7. If desired, place some granulated or confectioners’ sugar in a paper bag, add a couple sufganiyot, and gently shake to coat. Use the tip of a spoon to make a small indentation in the top of each sufganiyot, much as you would with a thumbprint cookie, and spoon in a little jam or jelly.
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Comments
Comments
  1. Alena says:

    YES! Oh my goodness – DOUGHNUTS! I made these tonight and they were outrageously good. I filled 1/2 with jam and 1/2 with dulce de leche. These would be so great tossed with cinnamon and sugar – next time!

    • Renee Schettler Rossi, LC Editor-in-Chief says:

      Lovely to hear, Alena!

      • Lana says:

        I am curious as I would like to make these in the bread maker, do you just put everything in the bread maker at one time?

        • Yes, a bread machine is perfect for this dough. It’s how I tested this recipe for the Chanukah chapter of my cookbook. Also, the reason I don’t suggest filling the doughnuts before frying is that oftentimes, depending on one’s frying prowess (or the fryer used), one runs the risk of a too-brown fried doughnut but inside the dough might be a touch raw and the jelly gooey – further compromising the not-totally-cooked-through doughnut, so to speak. So filling the doughnuts afterwards ensures you have a totally cooked doughnut, no gooey middle. Also, the jelly peaks out just so when you fill them after frying, a total temptation of the delights ahead.

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