Lemongrass-Cilantro-Crusted Ehu, Black Rice, and Mango

Lemongrass-Cilantro-Crusted Ehu, Black Rice, and Mango Recipe

Thai black rice, available at specialty stores and well-stocked Asian markets, makes a striking color contrast with any white-fleshed fish and many other foods. Like wild rice (which is not related, but which can be substituted here), black rice has a pleasantly crunchy texture and a nutty flavor.

You can, if you wish, use basmati or jasmine rice instead of black rice, and you can substitute onaga or opakapaka for the ehu, if you like.–Roy Yamaguchi

Lemongrass-Cilantro-Crusted Ehu, Black Rice, and Mango Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 25 M
  • 45 M
  • Serves 4

Ingredients

  • For the sweet black rice and mango
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 cup Thai black rice
  • 3/4 cup canned coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup diced mango
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • For the lemongrass-cilantro crust
  • 4 teaspoons minced fresh lemongrass
  • 4 teaspoons finely sliced scallion (green parts only)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves
  • Freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1/2 cup fish sauce
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • For the fish
  • Four 6-ounce ehu, onaga, or opakapaka fillets
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded, deribbed, and julienned, for garnish (optional)

Directions

  • Make the rice
  • 1. Bring the water to a boil in a saucepan and add the rice. Simmer for about 15 minutes, or until tender. Drain the rice and transfer to a bowl.
  • 2. While the rice is cooking, pour the coconut milk into a saucepan and bring to a boil. Cook until reduced by half; it will be thick and creamy in consistency. Stir in the cooked rice and the mango. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside and keep warm.
  • Make the crust
  • 3. Combine the lemongrass, scallion, cilantro, and pepper to taste. Pour the fish sauce and soy sauce into a shallow baking dish and stir to mix.
  • Saute the fish
  • 4. Coat the ehu on one side with the crust mixture and transfer to the baking dish (with the sauces in it), crust side up. Let stand for 5 minutes. Heat the canola oil in a large nonstick saute pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Saute the fish for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, or until opaque throughout.
  • 5. Transfer to warmed plates and serve with the rice alongside. Garnish with the julienned red pepper.
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Beth Price

Apr 06, 2005

What to do when a friend gives you ripe mangos? Look no further than this recipe. The combination of the cilantro and lemongrass topping with coconut mango rice is a perfect balance of Thai-inspired flavors, and the author’s suggested substitutions make this ingredient list is a snap to locate. The only time-consuming part of the recipe is waiting for the rice to cook. Follow the package instructions for wild rice and add a bit of salt to the cooking water to maximize the nutty flavor. If cooking for guests, cook the rice ahead of time and let cool on a sheet pan. While cooking the fish, reheat the rice in the warm reduced coconut milk, toss in the mangos and enjoy!


Comments
Comments
  1. Sofia Reino says:

    Used this recipe as an inspiration as I had just bought Chinese black rice and had two gorgeous and fresh red snappers. As I had no mango at home, I decided to substitute it with peaches. All I can say is wow, the various flavors working beautifully together. The rice has a thick chewy texture and a nutty flavor, yet the coconut milk gives it a tad of sweetness. The fish came out extremely moist with a beautiful crust on the skin. Its crust was nice and strong yet far from overpowering the taste of the actual fish. The peaches slices gave the whole plate a nice twist of coolness and sweetness that helped balancing the saltiness of the fish and bring the rice together. This is a recipe I will make very often

    • Renee Schettler Rossi says:

      Oh, how lovely, Sofia. And I want your source for fresh red snapper!

      • Sofia Reino says:

        My dear, there is a man called The Shrimp Man who comes to a local farmer’s market three times a week with freshly caught seafood from the coast of SC. So, come on down and we can make a full weekend filled with all types of seafood. Oyster season is to start mid September, he said.

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