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Strawberry Ice Pops | Paletas de Fresa

This is probably one of the most common paletas—maybe because the flavor is so kid- and adult-friendly. Strawberry paletas have been my brother’s favorite since he was a kid.

The best strawberries in Mexico are from Irapuato. They’re a kind of wild strawberry that sweetens the air, and people travel from all over to get big baskets of them. If you are lucky enough to have access to wild strawberries, which are smaller than those that you find at grocery stores have intensely but concentrated sweet flavor, please use them to make these paletas. They are so good and also quite delicate, so they squish easily—perfect for our purposes.–Fany Gerson

LC Unconventional Molds Note

We’re intrigued, not just by the gleeful grin of this little girl but by the mention in the last step of the instructions of “unconventional molds.” We can certainly understand a certain undeniable appeal of conventional molds, especially when your household contains hypercritical wee ones with very specific notions of what does–and does not–constitute a proper popsicle. But we’re also intrigued by the potential for popsicle shapes. Say, paper cups that you peel off. Glass cups, to be more environmentally correct. Shot glasses. Tea cups. Ice cube trays. Flutes, perhaps? Now go on, tell us the most inspired vessel you’ve ever harnessed as a popsicle mold.

Strawberry Ice Pops Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 10 M
  • 45 M
  • Makes 8 to 10

Ingredients

  • 4 cups fresh strawberries, preferably wild, hulled and cut into quarters
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup sugar, depending on the sweetness of the berries and of your sweet tooth
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

Directions

  • 1. Combine the strawberries and sugar in a bowl. Let sit until the strawberries start to release their juices, 20 to 30 minutes.
  • 2. Transfer the sugary strawberries and water to a saucepan and place over medium heat. Simmer until the berries are slightly softened, about 5 minutes. Let cool to room temperature.
  • 3. Transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor, add the lemon juice, and purée until the desired consistency, whether smooth or somewhat chunky.
  • 4. If using conventional molds, divide the mixture among the molds, snap on the lid, and freeze until solid, about 5 hours.

    If using glasses or other unconventional molds, freeze until the pops are beginning to set (1 1/2 to 2 hours, depending on the size), then insert the sticks and freeze until solid, 4 to 5 hours.
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