Potatoes with Mexican Chorizo | Papas con Chorizo

Papas con chorizo is my quick go-to meal for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. If I have it for breakfast, I scramble it with eggs and serve it rolled up in a warm flour tortilla. If it’s an appetizer I want, then I serve it with tostadas or on mini sopes. If I want to make papas con chorizo for dinner, I just make some gorditas [Editor's Note: Shown in photo above and explained in the LC Note below], stuff them, and serve them with some frijoles de olla on the side. All around it’s a quick, easy, lightly spicy dish packed with bold flavors.–Veronica Gonzales-Smith

LC Crazy Easy Recipe Alert! Note

Four words we love to see on any given weeknight: crazy easy recipe alert! Arguably the most difficult thing about the recipe is sourcing the queso quesadilla cheese. (What’s queso quesadilla cheese? It’s redundant, for one thing, seeing as “queso” means “cheese” in Spanish.) It’s a rich, creamy, mild cheese that melts ridiculously easily and is swell in any Mexican recipe, particularly when you crave something melty and ooey and gooey, as in the cheese’s namesake quesadilla—or this I-can’t-believe-it’s-so-simple, can’t-stop-cramming-it-in-my-mouth chorizo with potatoes. If you’re up for something ever so slightly more time-consuming, cram the papas con chorizo into gorditas, shown in the photo above. Gorditas are similar to corn tortillas but thicker, crispier, chewier, and, we think, happier. They’re essentially corn pockets made with corn flour—which is similar to but different than masa—and mashed potatoes that form the perfect crunch for this chorizo and fried potatoes. Leery? Watch author Veronica Gonzales make them below and you’ll understand just how easy peasy they are. Uh, four other words we have for this recipe? “Is really insanely satiating.”

Potatoes with Mexican Chorizo Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 25 M
  • 50 M
  • Serves 8

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 5 (about 1 1/2 pounds) russet or Yukon gold potatoes, washed, peeled, and diced into roughly 1/4-inch cubes
  • 10 ounces Mexican chorizo, store-bought or homemade, casings removed
  • 1 cup shredded queso quesadilla cheese (see LC Note above)

Directions

  • 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (176°C).
  • 2. Bring about 8 cups water to a boil in a deep pot with 1 1/2 tablespoons salt. Add the potatoes and cook over medium-high heat until almost but not quite tender, 8 to 15 minutes. Be careful not to overcook the potatoes or they’ll turn to mush. Drain the potatoes in a colander but do not rinse them.
  • 3. While the potatoes are cooking, crumble the chorizo into a cast-iron skillet or a casserole dish. Cover with foil and place in the preheated oven until no trace of pink remains, 15 to 20 minutes. Check after 10 minutes to make sure the chorizo isn’t burning. The chorizo will release some oil, but don’t discard it. (You can instead cook the chorizo in a skillet on the stovetop, especially if you prefer a crisped exterior. But I prefer the oven method because it makes less of a mess.)
  • 4. Add the drained potatoes to the cooked chorizo along with salt to taste and gently stir to combine. Mind you, don’t stir too much or the potatoes will turn to mush. Top with the shredded cheese, return the skillet to the oven, and bake, uncovered, just until the cheese melts, maybe 7 minutes or so. Serve immediately.
Hungry for more? Chow down on these:

Testers Choice

Testers Choice
Testers Choice
Susan Bingaman

Apr 29, 2013

Delicious! I filled warmed flour tortillas with the potatoes and chorizo for lunch, and the leftovers were fabulous with a fried egg for breakfast. I love the idea of a huge bowl of this set in the center of the table for breakfast, lunch, or dinner—served with tortillas and, as sacrilege as this sounds, sour cream and pico de gallo. This time, since I was just cooking for myself, I cut the recipe down by a fifth. I used 1 russet potato (it was a 15 ouncer), 2 ounces chorizo, and about 1/4 cup cheese. The chorizo took about 12 minutes to cook in the oven (by the way, genius cooking method). I folded in the waiting potatoes, topped with cheese, and popped the casserole dish back into the oven for about 2 minutes to melt the cheese. And as much as you want to, don’t blot the lovely orange fat rendered from the chorizo. It’ll beautifully infuse the potatoes with color and flavor. I chose not to season with the additional salt; it didn’t need it. I got 2 very hardy or 3 normal servings from one-fifth the recipe.


Comments
Comments
  1. [Alexander Cowan] Crazy easy recipe alert. I only have a few insights into this recipe that’d make it a little bit better. Mind you, 1/4-inch cubed potatoes cook very quickly so maybe start checking them for doneness around the 8-minute mark. I made the chorizo in the oven in a cast-iron casserole, which was pretty simple. Once the chorizo and potatoes were mixed together I reused the foil cover to wrap my tortillas and set those in the oven along with the casserole. It took around 4 minutes to melt the cheese and I was ready to tear into this killer-smelling dish. Add a few poached eggs and this was a very satisfying breakfast for dinner.

  2. [Jackie G.] This recipe, with just 4 ingredients, is really more of a guide to a creating a finished product than a recipe. You can easily adjust the ingredients using the proportions that you want to tailor the dish to your taste. I had a bag of red potatoes, and used 1 pound 10 ounces of them, as I was making this for 2 people. I really like Mexican chorizo, so I used 1 pound of that. I figured that we’d have a good breakfast as well as leftovers for a lunch the next day. I was surprised that the chorizo was cooked in the oven and not on the stovetop, but I’ll be using that technique again; it worked wonderfully. I checked the chorizo after it’d been in the oven for 10 minutes. There was a lot of liquid in the cast-iron pan. Much of it was fat, but there also appeared to be some water. I stirred the liquid into the chorizo, and put it back into the oven without the foil, for 5 more minutes. The chorizo was cooked through at the 15-minute mark. After reading the recipe, I’d been a bit disappointed that the potatoes wouldn’t be crisped up. While the chorizo was cooking in the oven, I took half the potatoes and crisped them up in another cast-iron skillet in some bacon fat. (There are times when you just can’t have too much pork fat.) When I added the potatoes to the chorizo I stirred the crispy potatoes into one-half of the pan, and the rest of the potatoes into the other side of the pan, curious to see if that made a difference. It didn’t. There was no need for that extra step. The potatoes were soft and succulent. It took only 2 1/2 to 3 minutes for the grated cheese to melt over the chorizo and potatoes. I was surprised at just how much we liked this dish. So much so that I really wished that I’d made a heck of a lot more than I had. We served this with eggs sunny-side up draped over the top. Poached would’ve been wonderful also. Do yourself a favor and do the same. The yolk running into the spicy chorizo and flavorful potatoes was icing on the cake. I can’t wait to make this again. The recipe is fantastic, with the bonus of being really easy to make. I’m planning on making it again next weekend,
    unless I can’t wait that long.

  3. [Melissa Maedgen] This recipe is simple, versatile, and best of all delicious. My 5 Yukon gold potatoes weighed 3 pounds and they cooked in slightly less than the 15 minutes specified, so the suggestion in the recipe to start testing after 10 minutes is a good one. I think the amount of water called for is just a bit low. I’d use a bit more water next time, and increase the salt to keep the same concentration. I didn’t have any issue with the chorizo scorching in the oven, and cooked it for 20 minutes total. I used an 8 1/2-by-13-inch baking dish for this, and it was a pretty good size to use, as once you add the potatoes you have a lot of food. I put it back in the oven for 8 minutes to melt the cheese. These were great freshly made and better still as leftovers; they can rock your lunchbox. If anything, they’re better the next day. They’d also be great for breakfast, topped with a fried egg. I’d probably omit the cheese for the breakfast serving. Number of servings? Not as easy to answer as you might think, as we had leftovers of these in different proportions. But we both had them as a side dish for dinner (2 servings), Moe had leftovers twice for lunch (2 more servings), I had them once for breakfast (1 more serving), and Moe and I each had a tiny portion as a snack (1/2 serving each?). That comes to 6 servings as a side dish.

  4. [Ralph Knauth] This is a very simple and adaptable recipe. You can have it for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. I love it for breakfast with eggs rolled up in a tortilla. But today I made it for dinner, served it with a fried egg, corn bread, and a green salad. Very comforting, great-tasting meal. Everybody loved it :) I used about a pound Yukon gold potatoes. I fried the chorizo in a wide pan, which worked just fine. No mess at all. I think it’s overkill to use the oven for that (though, you have to heat the oven anyways for the last step, so I guess you could fry the chorizo in the oven). I let the potatoes cool completely before adding them to the chorizo. In my experience from making bratkartoffeln (German-fried potatoes) or rösti (Swiss-fried potatoes), it works far better to use cold potatoes. Warm and not set potatoes tend to break up and stick to the pan. I used Cotija cheese, which worked great, and baked it in the 350°F oven for 10 minutes. During that time I fried the eggs and assembled the salad. It took me 43 minutes for the entire dish, not counting the cooling time for the potatoes. A truly easy and yummy recipe—absolutely a keeper. I used a high-quality chorizo, made by my son’s girlfriend’s dad. When using cheap chorizo, you might want to dump some of the rendered grease out.

  5. [Ayanna Fews] Sausage and potatoes mixed together and topped with cheese…how can this be a bad thing? This was a really simple and really good recipe. Quick to throw together and very flavorful. An added benefit is the beautiful color that the chorizo gives the potatoes when you mix the two together. I opted to cooked the chorizo in a frying pan on the stovetop and it didn’t produce a lot of oil, so I added a little olive oil to produce a little more of the chorizo oil goodness. I also added a few chopped-up scallions to add a touch of green to the dish. This’ll now be a new go-to recipe for me, especially when I want an easy side that makes me look like I spent extra time in the kitchen to produce something extra special! I used 5 smaller russet potatoes, which came to almost 5 pounds. At 10, maybe 11, minutes the potatoes were cooked just right. Finally, it took about 5 to 7 minutes to melt the cheese.

  6. [Larry Noak] This is a VERY tasty dish. I used about 1 1/2 pounds potatoes. This recipe works very well as written but in the future I’ll cook the chorizo in the cast-iron skillet on the stovetop to get a more brown, crispy texture. I turned the oven off and left the skillet in the oven for 5 minutes to melt the queso. You could use this as a side or an entrée. This would indeed work well for any meal, with any number of additions or variations (green chiles, eggs, etc.) I simply crisped a couple corn tortillas in a hot skillet and spooned this, as is, over the top. Nothing more was needed. The flavor of the corn with the chorizo, potato, and queso was wonderful.

  7. [Joel J.] Three things stick out in this recipe that should be adhered to: 1) Make sure you dice the potatoes to the 1/4-inch dice; this is important to be able to eat it with tortilla chips later. 2) Check the potatoes after 10 minutes, if not sooner. It won’t take long to cook potatoes diced that small. (I used 2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes.) 3) I’ll probably never cook chorizo on top of the stove again—it’s SO much less messy in the oven. If you use the cast-iron pan, once you gently mix in the potatoes and melt the cheese (watch closely, this only took about 2 minutes), you can serve it in the pan for a nice rustic look.

  8. [Marilee Johnson] I took this dish to a brunch and it was a HUGE hit! The recipe works as written. I used 5 russet potatoes that weighed about 2 pounds total. I cooked the chorizo in a skillet on the stovetop over low heat so it didn’t make a mess, as I had something sweet baking in the oven. After I combined the potatoes and the chorizo I topped it with the cheese and put it in the oven for about 10 minutes. I’d definitely make this again.

  9. [Susan C.] This was delicious! The combination of the spicy chorizo and creamy cheese was very satisfying. I also really liked the way the spice and oil from the chorizo coated the potatoes. Overall, a great addition to a breakfast burrito. My 5 russet potatoes were just over 2 pounds. My potatoes took 15 minutes to cook. The one complaint I have is about the cooking time for the chorizo. Mine wasn’t fully cooked in 20 minutes and needed an extra 5 minutes. I also think that onion would be a nice addition.

  10. [Trudy N.B.] This made for a great breakfast this a.m. I cut the recipe in half because there are only 2 of us, and it made about 5 servings. I used 3 russet potatoes, weighing about 1 1/2 pounds total. I also cut some prep time by just scrubbing the potatoes well and leaving the skin on because I like them that way—and maybe because I’m a tad lazy :) The potatoes were tender in about 8 minutes in the water. I liked cooking the chorizo in the oven, as it didn’t require any babysitting and was ready by the time the potatoes were done. This was the first time I’d used quesadilla cheese and I really liked the flavor. I put the casserole back in the oven for about 8 minutes to melt the cheese. It was a hit with the hubs who liked the hot chorizo I used. I served it with eggs and tortillas for him, but because I love kale and eat it with everything, I added some to my burrito and felt it was a nice complement to the well-seasoned chorizo. My only critique is to go easy on the salt once the potatoes and sausage are combined, as your chorizo may be salty enough. Overall, an easy, mostly hands-off dish that’s perfect for a lazy weekend morning!

  11. [Carol Mattox] I prepared this recipe for dinner. I used about 2 pounds russet potatoes. Dicing them into 1/4-inch cubes was the most time-consuming part of this recipe. The chorizo was a bit sticky, so the instructions to “crumble” it weren’t appropriate. Once the potatoes were added to the chorizo and combined and topped with the cheese, it took about 10 minutes before the cheese was melted and the dish was ready to eat. My tasters enjoyed the flavors and found this a delicious change of pace. The recipe is so easy to prepare, and the results so flavorful, that this’ll become a staple in our house. I’m anxious to try it again with some scrambled eggs for breakfast burritos.

  12. [Natalie R.] Not only is this a delicious, satisfying dish, but it’s also quick. Because it’s so simple, it’s the type of dish that can be put together any time of the day. I thought I could add an egg and I’d have a great breakfast dish. If I served it alongside a salad, dinner would be covered. Even the dicing of the potatoes (mine weighed in at 1 2/3 pounds) was a speedy process. After the potatoes and chorizo cooked in the oven for 20 minutes, it only took an additional 7 for the cheese to melt. I was unable to find queso quesadilla cheese, so I used a Ranchero queso fresco that melted beautifully on the potatoes. Everyone loved it!

  13. [Deitra Walter] A traditional papas that was quick to fix and pleasing to the family. Would be great the next morning with a couple eggs added to it for breakfast burritos. I used 2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes. Due to the size of the dice, my potatoes only needed 10 minutes to cook, which was perfect, as they held together during the stirring later. I cooked my chorizo in the oven as recommended and it took every bit of 20 minutes (when I checked at 10 minutes it was still very raw). It took 7 minutes for the cheese to melt in a 350° oven.

  14. This is crazy easy…but what with making the gorditas, a whole new measure of inconvenient comes to bear–mixing flour with mashed potatoes that need to be cooked, deep frying…whew. If I get home at 6, dinner won’t be till 7:30 so I can’t see this as easy peasy.

    One could simply use tortillas for these, granted, and sling the chorizo with the potato (which would need to be cooked) and be done earlier, but overall…while the dish is simple and easy, for a weeknight I’d have to pass on the gorditas making.

    • David Leite says:

      I hear you, dontcallmeachef. But the gorditas are “extra” in the recipe. The essential dish is the potatoes and chorizo, which can be done un under an hour. We added the gordita element for those with a bit more time on their hands. I like your idea of tortillas, though. Being Portuguese–the land where people love to eat rice and potatoes in the same dish–I’d be happy with this over some arroz.

Have something to say?

Then tell us. Have a picture you'd like to add to your comment? Send it along. Covet one of those spiffy pictures of yourself to go along with your comment? Get a free Gravatar. And as always, please take a gander at our comment policy before posting.

*

Daily Subscription

Enter your email address and get all of our updates sent to your inbox the moment they're posted. Be the first on your block to be in the know.

Preview daily e-mail

Weekly Subscription

Hate tons of emails? Do you prefer info delivered in a neat, easy-to-digest (pun intended) form? Then enter your email address for our weekly newsletter.

Preview weekly e-mail