Easy Guacamole

This easy guacamole is simple as heck and embraces a minimalistic philosophy with its authentic Tex-Mex approach that keeps ingredients to the essentials. Quick. Healthy. And the real deal.

A person mashing avocado into a bowl of easy guacamole on a table with salt, avocado, cilantro, lime, and chiles.

Everyone seems to have an opinion about what ingredients belong—and don’t belong—in guacamole We’re not saying this is the only guacamole recipe, nor are we saying it’s the definitive guacamole recipe. We’re simply saying we respect this simple concoction for being perfectly satisfying despite—or perhaps because—it contains no chili powder, no tomatoes, no pomegranate seeds, no other extraneous ingredients that, to many of us, just don’t belong.–Jessica Dupuy

How do I keep guacamole from turning brown?

Once you’ve smashed and mashed your way to the consistency that you want, letting the guac sit in the fridge for a while will help the flavors to meld. But we all know what happens to avocados when they get exposed to oxygen—they go brown. And fast. A piece of plastic wrap pressed directly against the surface of the guac—not just over the top of the bowl—blocks air from getting to it. If you find that a little bit of brown creeps in, you can just stir it in before serving and no one will be the wiser.

Easy Guacamole

A person mashing avocado into a bowl of easy guacamole on a table with salt, avocado, cilantro, lime, and chiles.
This easy guacamole is simple as heck and embraces a minimalistic philosophy with its authentic Tex-Mex approach that keeps ingredients to the essentials. Quick. Healthy. And the real deal.
Jessica Dupuy

Prep 15 mins
Total 15 mins
Appetizer
Mexican
24 servings
62 kcal
5 from 1 vote
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Ingredients 

  • 5 medium (about 2 lbs) ripe avocados halved and pitted
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (from about 1 to 2 limes)
  • 1/2 cup diced red or white onion (about 1/2 medium onion)
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 garlic clove minced (optional)
  • Up to 1/4 cup finely chopped cilantro leaves (optional)
  • Finely chopped jalapeño (optional)

Directions
 

  • Scoop the avocado out of its peel and into a large bowl. Grab a fork and mash until the avocado is still sorta chunky. (At this point, you want the consistency to be a little chunkier than your desired final consistency since there's still some more stirring to be done.)
  • Stir in the lime juice, onion, salt, garlic, and, if desired, cilantro and jalapeño and mix until it's as chunky or as smooth as you fancy. Serve right away or cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 4 hours to allow the flavors to meld.
Print RecipeBuy the United Tastes of Texas cookbook

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Show Nutrition

Serving: 2tablespoonsCalories: 62kcal (3%)Carbohydrates: 4g (1%)Protein: 1g (2%)Fat: 6g (9%)Saturated Fat: 1g (6%)Sodium: 49mg (2%)Potassium: 189mg (5%)Fiber: 3g (13%)Sugar: 1g (1%)Vitamin A: 45IU (1%)Vitamin C: 4mg (5%)Calcium: 6mg (1%)Iron: 1mg (6%)

Recipe Testers' Reviews

This guacamole is such an easy and forgiving recipe—it's really hard to mess it up. This is a great recipe on its own but it's also a wonderful base to build off, if you desire.

I only needed 1 lime to get 2 tablespoons of lime juice but definitely have 2 limes on hand when preparing this recipe. So often limes can be very stingy with the amount of juice they give you! If you're lucky to have a lime leftover, slice it into wedges and serve alongside the guacamole and whatever else you're having. Depending on what I have on hand, I'd add chopped cilantro, minced jalapeño, cumin, black pepper, or chopped tomatoes. Serve with tacos, fajitas, beans and rice, tortilla soup—you name it. I might eat it out of the bowl with a spoon. I used yellow onion since I didn't have red on hand. I didn't use cilantro because I didn't have it on hand.

This is a lovely, basic, and, yes, easy guacamole recipe that could be made precisely as written or further adorned as desired. My personal guacamole taste runs to the simple and the chunky, so this worked well for me. Some like it smoother, so this could be smashed and mashed further.

I've used lemons, a combination of lemon and lime, shallots, white onion, green onion, more garlic, less garlic, no garlic, tomatoes seeded or unseeded, sun-dried tomatoes, hot sauce, cilantro, no cilantro, jalapeños, serranos, poblanos, chipotle peppers, tomatillos, and many other seasonings including black pepper, cayenne, cumin, oregano, pepitas, or cheese. So use this as a definitive recipe, or as a jumping-off point—it’s quick and easy and actually can be kept beyond the “eat immediately” directive here.


Originally published May 5, 2016

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Comments

  1. Sounds good but I still make it the way I learned when I moved from NYS to Los Angeles back in the 70s: ripe avocado stirred — not mashed — with a fork to break it up into creamy lumps. Add finely chopped onion and garlic rubbed against a cutting board into a paste. Clean the ribs and seeds from a jalapeño and chop it fine. Remove the leaves from cilantro, chop them coarsely. Even people who taste the soapy notes in cilantro won’t taste it in the leaves. I know; I’m one of ’em! Chop a ripe tomato into small pieces keeping all the juices. Stir it all together with enough lime juice to make you pucker then smooth it out with some mayonnaise.

    If you’ve made some yummy fresh salsa you can add that in place of the tomatoes, chiles, onion & garlic.

    I know the mayo is unconventional and out here it’s fairly heretical but I really think it works to blend the flavors and take the edge off lots of acid and lots of chile. But DO defang the chiles by cleaning away the ribs as well as the seeds. You can taste the fruity notes that way and eat lots more guac!

      1. I used to use mayo in my guac when I lived in the northerly regions. Now that I live in AZ, I don’t. Since the avo’s here are so fresh & much more flavorful, and I think more moist & oily, the mayo isn’t needed. My secret cheat, if I’m in a hurry, is to use grinder garlic salt (shhhh). But always, fresh lime.

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