Pretzel Rolls

These pretzel rolls taste are just like the real German pretzel deal—shiny, salty, perfectly burnished, and densely bread-y. They’re reminiscent of a soft pretzel but in a more versatile shape so you can smother with butter, stuff with your favorite sandwich fixings, or inhale straight off the baking sheet.

Three pretzel rolls on a sheet of parchment sprinkled with coarse salt.

These pretzel rolls are easy to make at home and are just like the real German deal—shiny, salty, perfectly burnished, densely bread-y, and reminiscent of a soft pretzel but in a more versatile shape. Smother with butter, stuff with your favorite sandwich fixings, or inhale straight off the baking sheet.–Angie Zoobkoff

What do I do with pretzel rolls?

Well, let’s turn the question around and let you consider what do you want to do with pretzel rolls? Whatever your answer, it will probably work. You can simply devour them, slathered with butter or mustard or straight up. Although you could also turn them into sandwiches, whether ham, tuna salad, leftover meatloaf, BLT. Seriously, you really can’t go wrong.

Pretzel Rolls

  • Quick Glance
  • (22)
  • 30 M
  • 2 H, 30 M
  • Makes 10
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Ingredients


Directions

Make the pretzel rolls dough

In the bowl of your stand mixer fit with the dough hook, combine the flour, yeast, and salt.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the 1 1/4 cups warm water and butter. The mixture should be lukewarm.

Add the butter mixture to the flour mixture and mix until well combined, about 2 minutes. The dough shouldn’t be sticky.

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and continue kneading and punching it down until you have a smooth and elastic ball of dough, 2 to 3 minutes.

Place the dough back in the bowl, cover with a clean kitchen towel, and let rise in a warm place (preferably in a 100°F (35°C) warm oven) until double in size, about 60 minutes.

Shape the pretzel rolls

When the dough has doubled in size, punch it down, take it out of the bowl, and knead it for about 30 seconds.

Divide the dough into 10 equal portions of roughly 3 ounces (85 grams) each.

Dust your hands with flour, place a portion of dough on the palm of one hand, and with the other hand forming a dome over the dough, roll the dough between your palms until the top is round and firm and you can feel the tension increasing against your hand, about 10 seconds. This creates surface tension and prevents the rolls from deflating and becoming flat. Place the roll on the parchment paper and repeat with the remaining dough.

Cover the rolls with a towel and let rise in a warm place until puffy, about 20 minutes.

Boil the pretzel rolls

Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C). Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a large pot wide enough to fit 2 rolls at once, bring the 4 1/4 cups cold water and the baking soda to a boil. Carefully watch the heat as the baking soda-water mixture will foam up and you don’t want it to spill over.

With a slotted ladle or spoon, gently slip 2 rolls into the boiling water and cook for 30 seconds. Flip them and cook for another 30 seconds, being careful to not let them stick to the bottom of the pot. Transfer the rolls to a wire rack to dry and repeat with the remaining rolls.

Once dry, transfer them to the parchment-lined baking sheets.

Bake the pretzel rolls

Use the tip of a sharp knife to score a cross on top of each roll and sprinkle with coarse sea salt. Bake the pretzel rolls, 1 sheet at a time, until golden brown, about 16 minutes.

Transfer the rolls to a wire rack to cool slightly. Experience them while still warm, plain or with butter, although they’re also quite nice at room temperature. OrIginally published October 19, 2016.

Print RecipeBuy the Eat in My Kitchen cookbook

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Recipe Testers' Reviews

This my friends, is not your ordinary pretzel rolls recipe. In fact, I found this recipe to be EXTRAordinary. The pretzel roll dough is simple to put together and takes only 2 hours to mix the dough, let it rise, shape it, boil it, and, finally bake it to a shiny, rusty red perfection!

I've never used spelt dough but I assure you I’ll never choose another flour for pretzels of any design, be it rolls, big fat soft pretzels or, as I also did with this dough, a nice big loaf for sandwiches. I found the white spelt at Whole Foods. It’s a bit pricey at nearly 3 dollars a pound, but after using it, I find the cost worthwhile.

The recipe as written gave me 8 good size hamburger rolls or 10 nice dinner rolls or a perfect size sandwich loaf. (The loaf I made didn't have the usual oven spring associated with wheat dough but, it was a great sandwich loaf, that I DEMOLISHED in short order!)

I love that whatever I tried to make with this dough, all things pretzel worked to perfection without altering a thing other than the shape. If you use the dough hook, very little kneading will be necessary. This simple delicious recipe has already been given quite a workout in my home and will most certainly be added to the rotation for the rest of our natural lives!

These pretzel roll gems were salty, chewy, and doughy in every way you'd expect a soft pretzel to be. They were easy to make, the dough was extremely easy to work with, and the timing in the recipe was spot on. Easy enough for a weeknight and a winner with the whole family.

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Comments

  1. These look fabulous! I’m planning on trying them this weekend, but was hoping to modify to make buns for sausages. Any advice?

    1. Hi Craig, as you shape the rolls you could try elongating them a bit. Or you could just cut your sausages in helf and serve them side by side on the roll.

  2. Got mine proofing right now, but I was wondering if anyone has tried to freeze some after 1st rise? THis way I’d only need to cook as many as I need, and they’d always have that fresh baked taste and feel.

    1. Roberto, we haven’t tried this so we can’t say for certain, but it should work. You should be able to freeze the rolls for up to 3 months. Defrost in the refrigerator overnight before proceeding with the boiling and baking. Alternatively you may also be able to freeze the rolls after the boiling step, and simply salt and bake the rolls as you need them. Let us know how it turns out!

  3. Hi, I intend on making these very soon. I had purchased food grade lye for another baking project, and I am wondering your opinion on proportions of lye to water, and do they need to boiled in the mix, or simply dipped. There are so many opinions out there as to the correct method and I am curious about yours.

  4. I was so intrigued by this recipe that I just had to give it a try. My rolls turned out nice and plump, with a beautiful outer crust and tasted great on the inside as well. I used bread flour for this recipe. We finished a couple fresh hot out of the oven along with some butter… Heaven! However when I left these rolls to cool overnight, they became very dense and hard on the following day. I wonder what I did wrong? Should I not have left them out in the open overnight? We did anyway make some Lamb and Cheese burgers with Caramelized Onions as planned! Please let me know if you can guide me with the texture, would really appreciate it! Thank you so much for the recipe 🙂

    1. Ashrrita, those are utterly gorgeous!! As the recipe says, it’s best to experience them warm from the oven, as you did. They’re irresistible that way. Leaving them out uncovered overnight definitely contributed to their texture the next day. My suggestion is to wrap them in foil and gently reheat them in the oven. If you’re not microwave averse, you can zap them a bit. They won’t be oven-fresh, but they should be better than what you experienced.

  5. Amazing rolls! I don’t usually leave reviews but these were simply amazing, so quick and easy and came out perfectly that I had to. Highly recommended

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