Caipirinha

The caipirinha is an easy to make cocktail made with just three ingredients: cachaça (cane liquor), sugar, and lime. Indulge with caution. Brazil’s national drink, a Latin American classic, packs a punch. We’ve modified it a touch, adding more lime and sugar to temper the liquor, but feel free to tweak to your desire.

A martini glass filled with caipirinha and a lime wheel on a bar with liquor bottles in the background.

Caipirinha

  • Quick Glance
  • 10 M
  • 10 M
  • Serves 1 to 2
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Ingredients

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  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (from 1 large lime), or less to taste
  • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 2 ounces cane liquor (cachaça), or less to taste
  • 1 cup crushed ice cubes
  • 1 lime wheel, for garnish

Directions

  • 1. Pour the lime juice into a cocktail shaker and add the sugar. Stir to dissolve.
  • 2. Pour in the cachaça and crushed ice. Shake well.
  • 3. Empty the contents of the shaker into a martini glass and garnish with the lime.

Pineapple Caipirinha

  • For a slightly more tropical spin on the caipirinha, swap 1 teaspoon pineapple juice for 1 teaspoon of sugar.

Recipe Testers Reviews

This drink knocks your socks off! We did 5 rounds of testing over 2 days to decide how we liked it best. The way it's written it's really good, though a bit tart for our taste.

The addition of just 1 teaspoon of fresh pineapple juice balanced the flavors out made it a "wow" for us. We also preferred the drink shaken vice stirred.

We've decided that this will be our summer drink this year!

The sum of these few ingredients produces a nice drink that you can enjoy while sipping and swirling. In fact, as the fresh pineapple swirls in the drink and the ice melts a bit, the drink becomes more enjoyable, so be sure and stir it all well.

I used a relatively young Cachaça (Ypióca Brasilizar Cachaça Prata Classica, aged one year) and as this was a new flavor for me. Initially it was more startling, but had a necessary edge. To confirm that, I also tried a version with a white rum I had on hand, with longer aging in oak (Flor de Caña) but found that it was not as interesting as the Cachaça.

I served this in a rounded, stemless glass and found it went down all too easily, so I was glad I had split it between two of us although one would have been lovely all to myself.

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