Chai Latte

Making this chai latte at home is easier than you may think. It requires only tea, milk, ginger, brown sugar, and a few spices. No fancy machinery. Just a pleased palate.

Two glasses of chai latte with cinnamon sticks on a wooden surface.

Love the richly spiced flavor of a good chai latte but need to know how to recreate it at home? Us, too. Thankfully, with just a handful of spices, tea, and milk, you can make your own. No fancy machinery (or wait in line) required.–Angie Zoobkoff

Chai Latte

  • Quick Glance
  • Quick Glance
  • 10 M
  • 25 M
  • Serves 2
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Ingredients


Directions

In a small saucepan over high heat, bring the spices, ginger, and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and gently simmer until fragrant, about 15 minutes.

Whisk in the sugar and then add the tea bags. Turn off the heat, cover, and let steep for 3 minutes.

Strain the tea mixture through a fine sieve into a serving pot. Wipe out the pan.

In the same pan over medium heat, warm the milk until just simmering and then remove from the heat and whisk until frothy. (Alternatively, if you have a milk frother, go ahead and use it.)

Pour the milk into the serving pot, stirring to combine. Serve immediately.

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Recipe Testers' Reviews

I could (and sometimes do) drink chai all day long. I'm lucky enough to have lived near Kasa in San Francisco and I am beyond addicted to their tea. Anytime I see a chai recipe, I always make it and am then disappointed that it's not as good as the brew at Kasa. This recipe was different and surely has potential. I love its simplicity of ingredients and technique.

The times can and should be adjusted to one’s liking after an initial attempt with these guidelines. This isn't something that needs to brew all night (I've tried those) nor do I need to go out and buy unusual ingredients (mace, for example) that I don't have on hand.

Hands on time: less than 5 minutes if you know where your spices are AND if you have an espresso and/or milk frother machine

I used 2% milk for my milk and Assam loose black tea. I halved the recipe as it was just me drinking it. I also used a teaspoon of fresh grated ginger as I always have a jar of it from The Ginger People in my fridge to cut down on grating and peeling time.

I think the first step where the recipe calls for putting the spices, water, and ginger together to steep for 15 minutes is generous. And it was way too sweet for me. Next time I would try 1 tsp sugar for a half batch and not boil the spices for so long at the beginning. I like that the spices and ginger were simmered together before the addition of the tea so that the tea wasn't black tea-forward but spice-forward, exactly how a chai should be.

It would be important for anyone making this to pay close attention to how long the tea is in the hot water mixture. I think 3 minutes would be the maximum for me but this is a very personal choice and one that warrants exploration. That's the great part of this recipe - it gives a framework and accessible method to learn how to make a solid cup of chai.

This made for a lovely snow day (blizzard) drink after a snowshoe adventure. It took just a few minutes to assemble all of the ingredients. I didn't have 1 1/2 inches of fresh ginger so I used the half inch that I had on hand and found it to be plenty. I made it with dairy milk.

In other Chai recipes you tend to boil everything together–the spices and tea, and then add the milk and sugar. It’s less time-consuming that way and tastes good as well. Heating the milk in a different pot seems a little unnecessary. Why not add it to the steeped tea and spice mixture?

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