SweeTango Apple Rose Tart

SweeTango® apples, one of the finest eat-out-of-hand apples, is the pomme de choix for this stunning apple rose tart. Because the apples aren’t baked, their crisp bite of honey and citrus shine through, and the creamy apple-butter custard adds a luscious mouthfeel. This is a sponsored post.

A Sweetango apple rose tart on a glass cake stand

Apples and me, we go way back. When we moved into our new home in 1966, Papa Leite filled our backyard with fruit trees. There were pears, peaches, plums, and several kinds of apples–yellow delicious, red delicious, and Macintosh. That’s on top of the strawberries, grapes (for wine), corn, tomatoes, kale, potatoes, and peppers.

Português translates to “he who cannot stop planting things to eat because it’s in his DNA.”

Papa Leite picking his beloved yellow delicious apples

The apple trees were of the most interest to me for several reasons: 1) they required far less work than the vegetable garden, and even at 7 years old, I was allergic to manual labor, and 2) they were just outside my bedroom windows. I could watch as they morphed from skeletal hands in winter, to huge white pompoms of blossoms in spring, to hundreds of swaying earrings in summer, finally to redolent orbs bending closer and closer to the ground every autumn day.

Short of space but not of ambition, my father grafted other types of apples onto the main apple stock–Honeycrisp, Cortland, Pippin. Some took, some didn’t, but it never dissuaded Papa Leite.

What’s interesting, and, now that he’s gone, a little sad–my dad rarely ate his apples. He was more interested in giving them away to anyone–and I do mean anyone–who stopped by the house. Or those who went to my parents’ church. (Yes, my dad actually took baskets of apples to church to give away. Papa Leite had his own side hustle running an apple ministry right there in the parking lot.)

Every year when Roxbury’s countryside fills with the sweet honey smell of apples and freshly pressed cider, I think of my father. I see him as he was all those years ago–perched on the top of a ladder (sporting some groovy Clint Eastwood sideburns), carefully cradling apples and gently twisting them off the branches. I recall sitting with him on the back step, watching him peel the apples in one unbroken baroque curl using his pocketknife. He’d then cut slices, pushing the blade against his thumb, sprinkle them with salt, and feed them to me right off the blade.

If he ate his apples, that’s how he preferred them–just picked, lightly salted, and off the carefully honed blade of his knife. “That’s the only way to eat it,” he’d say.

It’s because of this lifelong relationship to apples, and to honor Papa Leite, that I partnered with SweeTango® apples this autumn.

WHAT IS A SWEETANGO® APPLE?

SweeTango Apple

I gotta be honest, I didn’t know. But you know me, I had to do my homework, so I researched. This baby is the product of a beautiful apple marriage. It’s the patented crossbreeding between one of my dad’s favorite apples, the Honeycrisp, and the Zestar, which created the Minneiska–the official name of SweeTango®. It all began with a tree that was grafted all the way back in 1988. The apples were loosed onto the world in 2007. By that time, my dad had long since retired his mini orchard. I’d like to think he’d happily sit on the back step with me, a SweeTango®, a salt shaker, and his pocketknife in hand.

WHAT DO THEY TASTE LIKE?

This was the big test for me. If I were partnering with a company, frankly, the apples had to jump through a lot of hoops to win me over. Specifically, the crunch and flavor tests. As to crunch, these little guys take top prize. They’re supremely crispy with a satisfying crunch. None of the mealy mouthfuls I’d been getting lately. And not just crunchy but juicy-crunchy. Like, laugh-out-loud-cuz-juice-is-running-down-your-chin crunchy.

Crunchy is great, juicy even better. But taste? That’s the final frontier. I’m always leery of advertising claims. I was a copywriter for 18 years, so I know the dance some products have to do. I gotta say, no one is doing a jig here. When they say SweeTango® apples have a sweet bite with hints of citrus and honey, it’s as advertised. The flavor is nuanced, with a sweetness hitting your mouth first, then the roundness of honey, and last the citrus–for me it’s lemon–which lingers. Let me put it this way, these apples are so damn good, I had to replace that beauty above three times because I kept eating them.

WHEN AND WHERE CAN I FIND SWEETANGO® APPLES?

A Sweetango apple rose tart on a glass cake stand

SweeTango® apples have limited availability–September 1 to February 28. So start shopping and munching now. To find a list of stores near you that sell SweeTango®, use this handy dandy apple locator. Think of it as your Flavor GPS. You can also Follow SweeTango® Apples on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for the most up-to-date information.

David Leite's signature

SweeTango® Apple Rose Tart

A Sweetango apple rose tart on a glass cake stand
SweeTango® apples, one of the finest eat-out-of-hand apples, is the pomme de choix for this elegant, easy apple rose tart. Because the apples aren't baked, their crisp bite of honey and citrus shine through, and the creamy apple-butter custard adds a luscious mouthfeel.
David Leite

Prep 3 hrs
Cook 30 mins
Cool 3 hrs
Total 6 hrs 30 mins
Dessert
American
10 slices
541 kcal
4.67 / 3 votes
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Equipment

  • 10-inch tart pan with removable bottom
  • Toothpicks

Ingredients 

For the pastry

  • 8 tablespoons (4 oz) unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour plus more for the work surface
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Baking spray
  • Granulated sugar to weigh down the crust while baking

For the apple-butter custard

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 5 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 large pinch salt
  • 5 large egg yolks
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup sweetened thick apple butter (must be thick, similar to tomato paste)
  • 3 tablespoons (1.5 oz) unsalted butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the SweeTango® apple roses

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 8 to 10 SweeTango® apples

Directions
 

Make the pastry

  • Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream butter, sugar, and salt on medium speed until pale and light, 2 to 3 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula.
  • Add flour and beat on low speed until combined, 15 to 30 seconds. The mixture will look like wet sand.
  • Add egg yolk and vanilla and continue to mix on low speed until the dough comes together.
  • Flatten dough into a 6-inch (15-cm) disc, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  • Once dough is chilled, lightly coat tart pan with baking spray.
  • Remove dough from refrigerator and let soften at room temperature for about 10 minutes. Using a rolling pin, bang and flatten the dough into a disk about 1/2-inch thick. Flour the work surface, then sprinkle the disk with flour. Roll out dough into a 12-inch (30-cm) circle.
  • Carefully wrap dough circle around pin, then unfurl it over the tart ring. Press into the bottom and up the sides of the pan, using any scraps to patch tears or fill in missing bits. Trim edge with a knife so it's even with the rim of the pan.
  • Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. 
  • Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven, and crank the heat to 350°F (176°C).
  • Line tart with foil and fill to the top with granulated sugar. (Granulated sugar is the best pie weight. Plus after a few uses you get lovely toasted sugar!)
  • Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden brown. Move to a cooling rack, remove foil and sugar, and let cool completely in the pan.

Make the apple-butter custard

  • In a medium saucepan, whisk together sugar, cornstarch, and salt.
  • Add yolks and whisk thoroughly into a smooth paste.
  • Gradually add the milk until well incorporated.
  • Heat mixture over medium heat and whisk constantly until custard comes to a gentle boil. It will "burp" or "wink" as small bubbles rise to the surface.
  • Once the custard is boiling and burping, cook for 1 full minute more, whisking the whole time. The cornstarch needs the full minute of boiling to set the custard.
  • Whisk in apple butter and continue cooking for another minute. Stir in butter and vanilla and remove from heat.
  • Immediately pour custard into a shallow bowl and press plastic wrap directly on the surface. Chill at least 3 hours or overnight.

Make the SweeTango® apple roses

  • In a medium pan, bring water, sugar, and lemon juice to a boil. Whisk to dissolve sugar. Slide pan off heat.
  • Meanwhile, cut 1 or 2 apples in half from stem to blossom end. Place an apple half cut side down to steady it. Starting from one side, slice apple into half moons, no thicker than 1/8 of an inch. When you reach the core (you'll feel the seeds as you cut), turn the apple around, and repeat on the other side. (Don't discard the bit of leftover apple. Munch!)
  • Dunk apple slices in the hot liquid until just pliable enough to roll into roses, 15 seconds to 1 minute, depending on their thickness. Remove half moons with a slotted spoon and transfer to a plate.
  • Curl an apple half moon around itself to start a rosebud. Keep adding petals to the outside to build a rose. If needed, skewer rose with a few toothpicks to hold petals in place. Place rose on a plate.
  • Repeat with remaining apples until you have enough roses to cover the tart. You may have to reheat the syrup when adding more apples.

    TESTER TIP: Not in a rosy mood? No harm, no foul. Overlap apple slices in concentric circles (as in the far end of the pictures above) to cover the tart.

    If not serving the tart within an hour or so, cover roses with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Assemble and serve

  • Whisk apple-butter custard to make it smooth.
  • Fill crust with custard, smoothing the top with a spatula.
  • Remove toothpicks from apple roses and plant them on the tart. Carry to the table and watch everyone's mouth drop!
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Notes

Can I use a mandoline to slice the apples?

Um, sure. Feel free to pull out your “French finger guillotine.”  I’d love to say that in the making of this apple rose tart, no cook was harmed, but it just ain’t so. I cut myself three times–count ’em–three times! I find using a paring knife faster, easier, and way safer. But if you’re a wiz with the mando, go for it!

Show Nutrition

Serving: 10servingsCalories: 541kcal (27%)Carbohydrates: 94g (31%)Protein: 5g (10%)Fat: 18g (28%)Saturated Fat: 10g (63%)Polyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 5gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 150mg (50%)Sodium: 157mg (7%)Potassium: 284mg (8%)Fiber: 4g (17%)Sugar: 73g (81%)Vitamin A: 713IU (14%)Vitamin C: 10mg (12%)Calcium: 90mg (9%)Iron: 1mg (6%)

HUNGRY FOR MORE?

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Comments

  1. 5 stars
    This. Recipe. Was. Amazing. It was so much fun to make and wonderful to savour! It was my first time trying the SweeTango apple and I’m hooked. It’s everything you want in an apple and this tart is everything you want in a tart! I didn’t have apple butter so I used my Leite’s Culinaria roasted apple sauce. It added a bit more texture to the custard but worked beautifully. A true feast for the eyes and palate! Thank you, David! Your recipe is total pizzazz!

    1. Wow, Ilda! That is a gorgeous tart and I’m delighted to hear that it worked out for you with the roasted applesauce. I can’t wait to hear what you make next.

  2. 5 stars
    I was drawn to this recipe by the simple word “SweeTango”. Being from Minnesota – home of SweeTango (and its parent apples), I simply had to make this pie. Delicious it is! To be honest, I had never made an apple rose before but the picture is SOOOO beautiful – I had to try. They were easier than I imagined and worth the effort to Wow! your guests and yourself. (I did use the mandoline method. Practice makes perfect. And using the hand guard). The custard comes together easily – lightly seasoned with the THICK apple butter. (I suggest Musselman’s brand if you can find it). Don’t worry about leftovers. My pie was gone in one sitting!

    1. Thanks, Deb! We’re delighted that this was such a success. Thanks so much for taking the time to let us know.

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