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Goan-Style Chouriço

Two patties of Goan-style chourico being cooking in a metal skillet.
Goan sausage is sometimes referred to as choriz or chorizo in India. You often won’t hear of pork outside Goan or in Indian Christian communities, and it’s even rarer to see it on the menu of an Indian restaurant. Here's how to make it yourself.
Nik Sharma

Prep 20 mins
Chill 1 hr
Total 1 hr 20 mins
Entrees
Indian
4 servings | 1 pound
325 kcal

Ingredients 

  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1 pound ground pork (preferably with as much fat as possible)
  • 1/4 cup coconut or apple cider vinegar
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • One (1-inch) piece fresh ginger peeled and grated
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon Kashmiri chile powder*
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon jaggery or brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions 

  • Using a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, finely grind the black peppercorns, cumin seeds, and cloves and dump into a large bowl.
  • Add the remaining ingredients and mix with a fork or your hands to combine everything.
  • Shape the mixture into a log, wrap with wax paper or parchment paper, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or preferably overnight to let the flavors meld. (It can be wrapped in plastic wrap and then stashed in a resealable plastic bag in the freezer for up to 1 month. Thaw before using.)
  • Cut off pieces of the chouriço as needed. Cook in a skillet over medium-high heat until the internal temperature reaches 160°F (73°C) on an instant-read thermometer, about 10 minutes.

Notes

*What can I substitute for Kashmiri chile powder? 

Kashmiri chile powder isn't particularly spicy, it's used more for the color than for a hit of spicy heat. It has a mild, smoky flavor and is only slightly hotter than paprika. A good substitute is a combination of smoked paprika and cayenne. For this recipe, you'll need 2 1/2 teaspoons of smoked paprika and 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne to equal 1 tablespoon of Kashmiri chile. You can use regular paprika if you don't have the smoked kind but it will lack the smokiness.