Forgot to Look Both Ways

Look Right

We interrupt David’s stream of consciousness about air travel for this important message.

You know how in Britain they drive on the opposite side of the street than in the States? And how back home we always look to the left for oncoming traffic before crossing? Well, London has clearly had its fair share of befuddled Americans walking into traffic, seeing as it painted helpful suggestions on the pavement as to which way to look at almost every intersection. Earlier today, while crossing the Strand to get to the Courtald Gallery, David unfortunately missed this warning to “look right.” And with David, you can only imagine what happened. So his blog posts will still be published while we’re in London–but on a slightly delayed schedule.

P.S. David made me write this blog entry because he’s embarrassed that he’s already fallen behind on his writing. He’s absolutely, perfectly fine. He just wanted to drum up some sympathy for himself as a way of diverting you from the fact that he’s been a bad blogger. So just play along. Please? For my sake. You have no idea what it’s like being in the same room with him when he’s like this.

David Leite's signature

Comments

  1. This is hysterical. Oh, not your plight, David, but The One has done so well in your stead and I do sympathize with him. I can just imagine you. I am not laughing at you but with you. Are you laughing? I want to hear more from The One.

    1. Donna, darling, I hear your good-natured laugh. Yes, I was all fainting couches and “why-has-the-entire-city-of-London-conspired-to-get-ME” kind of thinking. (There are shades of Mitchell and Cam from “Modern Family” in our relationship to be sure.) The One is so used to my fits of over-dramatizing, he just gives me a patronizing pat on the knee and goes on reading his book. That is–until he almost got flattened by a motorcycle later that same day. Then suddenly there were two of us bemoaning the British travel system, which is older than the United States.

  2. Glad David’s OK. Thanks to The One for keeping us informed while David’s gathering his self. Hoping for a safe and fun trip for you both.

    1. Joan, all is well, thank you so much. David is 100 percent fine, except he’s having to much fun to blog. (It’s just him being dramatic.)

  3. Sure. I’ll play along. The “Mind the Gap” and “Mind Your Head” signs are quaint but helpful throughout the UK. Much of the time those signs are found in gorgeous, ancient and atmospheric castles. I love the UK and have been fortunate to visit Wales, England and Scotland several times. Driving in the UK can be chaotic. Our first time my husband had to get used to the gear shift to his left and the gears were opposite, too. Not only that but driving on tiny narrow roads between stone walls with no “ditches”, trying to avoid hitting dogs and sheep, entering roundabouts (which we love – wish we had those here) and navigating can be rather tricky. Sometimes as a passenger you just have to close your eyes and hope for the best. Now my husband is proficient driving throughout Europe, except perhaps in tiny villages with streets so narrow that at one point our mirrors on our rental car scraped buildings on BOTH SIDES at the same time (in Sicily).

    Anyway, “Look Right” brings back fond memories of London and of travel in general. We are heading off on our own European adventure next week and are excited.

    So, David, be good and keep safe. Enjoy London.

    1. Brenda, driving in the UK! I will never do it again. I drove David and our friends Matty and Janet through England and Wales. Too many opposite-side things to keep track of. And those roundabouts? I can’t tell you how many times I went around and around trying to inch my way off to the exit! I applaud your husband.

      1. Driving in Bawstan is just as treacherous. The roundabouts & the honking horns and hand gestures! Once was enough for me. A friend who went to Harvard described Bawstan driver as “animals.” There’s no place like home…

          1. David…perhaps you need to rest a tad more. You would rather drive in Portugal than Boston? As my dear husband says, we Portuguese are very nice people, until we get behind the wheel and then think we’re all Mario Andrettis…

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