Pumpkin Mashed Potatoes

These pumpkin mashed potatoes are comforting (and colorful!) thanks to the addition of pumpkin puree to creamy spuds. And you thought mashed potatoes couldn’t get any better.

A big pot of pumpkin mashed potatoes with a pat of butter on top, wooden spoon on the side.

Like classic velvet mashed potatoes, this mash is creamy and comforting. Although it takes an extra dose of color and flavor with the surprise addition of pumpkin puree. Tasting is believing.

We’re pretty certain that since there’s more vegetable in them, they’re automatically healthier than your standard mashed spuds. Which means having a second helping is not only perfectly acceptable but actually encouraged. Can someone pass the potatoes, please?–Angie Zoobkoff


Why our testers loved this

Our testers were incredibly pleased that the simple addition of one ingredient elevated a standard bowl of mashed potatoes to something new and noteworthy. They also loved that it came together easily and was a perfect accompaniment to Thanksgiving dinner.

Notes on ingredients

  • Yukon Gold potatoes–Creamy Yukon Gold potatoes are best here, but russets will also work. Avoid waxy potatoes for this recipe.
  • Butter–Salted or unsalted butter will work here, just adjust your salt level accordingly when seasoning the finished pumpkin mash.
  • Pumpkin puree–This is simply pureed cooked pumpkin with no added seasonings. You can purchase it canned or make it at home. Do not substitute pumpkin pie filling.

How to make this recipe

  1. Cook the potatoes. Boil the potatoes in salted water until tender. Drain.
  2. Heat the pumpkin puree. Heat the milk and butter until the butter melts, then stir in the pumpkin puree.
  3. Mash the potatoes. Pass the potatoes through a ricer, then mix in the pumpkin puree.

FAQs

Can I make my own pumpkin puree?

Definitely. To make homemade pumpkin puree, simply roast cubes or halves of fresh pumpkin until tender, dump into the food processor, and blitz until smooth.

I don’t have a ricer. What can I use instead?

A ricer will give you the smoothest, fluffiest mash, but a regular potato masher will work fine here.

What can I do with leftover pumpkin mashed potatoes?

We’ve got a few suggestions. You can stuff them into these crispy mashed potato tacos. Or shape them into patties and make leftover mashed potato cakes. Or use them to top this easy cottage pie.

Helpful tips

  • Leftover pumpkin mash can be stored in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days. Reheat in the microwave, or a saucepan over medium-low heat, stirring frequently.
  • This recipe is suitable for gluten-free and vegetarian diets.

More great pumpkin recipes

☞ If you make this recipe, or any dish on LC, consider leaving a review, a star rating, and your best photo in the comments below. I love hearing from you.–David

Pumpkin Mashed Potatoes

A big pot of pumpkin mashed potatoes with a pat of butter on top, wooden spoon on the side.
These mashed potatoes with pumpkin are comforting (and colorful!) thanks to the addition of pumpkin puree to creamy spuds. And you thought mashed potatoes couldn't get any better.

Prep 20 mins
Cook 30 mins
Total 50 mins
Sides
American
8 servings
324 kcal
5 / 2 votes
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Equipment

  • Potato ricer

Ingredients 

  • 4 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes peeled and cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) chunks
  • 1 stick butter
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup plain pumpkin puree
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black or pepper

Directions
 

  • In a large saucepan, cover the potatoes with enough salted water to cover and boil until tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Drain well.
  • In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, warm the butter and milk until the butter melts, about 6 minutes. Add the pumpkin puree and stir well. Remove from the heat.
  • Press the potatoes through a ricer into a bowl and mix in the pumpkin mixture. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
Print RecipeBuy the Potluck cookbook

Want it? Click it.

Notes

  1. Storage–Leftovers can be stored in a sealed container for up to 4 days. Reheat in the microwave or a saucepan over medium-low heat, stirring frequently.
  2. Dietary–This recipe is suitable for gluten-free and vegetarian diets.

Show Nutrition

Serving: 1portionCalories: 324kcal (16%)Carbohydrates: 45g (15%)Protein: 7g (14%)Fat: 14g (22%)Saturated Fat: 8g (50%)Polyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 36mg (12%)Sodium: 43mg (2%)Potassium: 1102mg (31%)Fiber: 6g (25%)Sugar: 6g (7%)Vitamin A: 5223IU (104%)Vitamin C: 46mg (56%)Calcium: 107mg (11%)Iron: 2mg (11%)

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Recipe Testers’ Reviews

If you’re looking for a different take on mashed potatoes, I would suggest giving this pumpkin mashed potatoes recipe a try. As a lover of mashed potatoes, the idea of adding pumpkin intrigued me.

I usually like pumpkin as a sweet dessert but not as much in savory dishes. This mash has become an exception. It’s creamy, delicious, and unique.

This recipe for mashed potatoes with pumpkin was a simple twist on a classic staple side dish that could easily become part of Thanksgiving traditions. It was a fabulous way to make a savory pumpkin dish.

The ease of simply whisking up the butter, milk, and pumpkin and adding it to the potatoes made for an efficient accompaniment to many main dishes. I didn’t have to spend too much time assembling ingredients and preparing anything.

I might add more salt to the potatoes, maybe 2 teaspoons after they have been mashed. Additionally, I would add slightly more pumpkin, maybe 1/3 cup more, to really be able to have that flavor acknowledged.

HUNGRY FOR MORE?

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