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Grandma Leite’s Doughnuts | Malassadas

This recipe, adapted from the one my dad’s mom used to make in the Azores, has a flood of memories attached to it. I would sleep over at her house many a Friday night, and on Saturdays she’d make these for my cousins, Fatima and Joe, and me. Hot out of the sugar-cinnamon bowl is the only way to eat them.

In the Azores, some cooks shape these over their knees until they’re practically the size of lunch plates, just like my grandmother used to do. Others stretch and flop them out in their hands. I’ve made these smaller so they’re easier to work with, and fiddled with the recipe a touch, but beyond that, welcome to my childhood.–David Leite

LC Puffy, Crispy, Fried Dough Goodness Note

Whatever you call this recipe for Portuguese fried dough—malassadas, doughnuts, fritters, heavenly—we think you’ll be woo’d by the infallibly puffy, crispy, fried dough goodness. We certainly were.

Portuguese Doughnuts | Mallassadas Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 25 M
  • 4 H, 30 M
  • Makes 24

Ingredients

  • For the doughnuts | malassadas
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for the baking sheet
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 package active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons or 1/4 ounce)
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons warm water, 110°F (43°C)
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • Vegetable oil, for frying
  • For the cinnamon sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

  • Make the doughnuts | malassadas
  • 1. Heat the milk, butter, and salt in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, just until steam begins to curl from the surface and bubbles form around the edges, about 5 minutes. Set aside to cool until lukewarm.
  • 2. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, dissolve the yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar in the warm water. Let stand until foamy, about 10 minutes.
  • 3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or with a hand mixer in a large bowl, beat the remaining 1/3 cup sugar and the eggs on medium-high until thick and luscious looking, about 5 minutes. Switch to the dough hook, add the milk mixture, the yeast mixture, and the flour, and mix on low speed until a soft dough forms, about 7 minutes, adding more flour if needed. The dough should be just slightly tacky but not sticky.
  • 4. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface, shape into a ball, and place in a lightly buttered bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm, draft-free spot until double in size, about 2 hours.
  • 5. Lightly coat a 13-by-18-inch rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray and turn the dough onto the pan. Press and poke it with your fingers, much like making focaccia, to help stretch it until it’s about 1/2 inch thick. Lightly coat the top of the dough with cooking spray, loosely cover the pan with plastic wrap, and let the dough rest until double in size, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  • Make the cinnamon sugar
  • 6. Mix together the sugar and cinnamon in a shallow bowl.
  • Fry the doughnuts | malassadas
  • 7. Fill a medium saucepan with 3 inches of oil and heat over medium-high heat until it reaches 350°F on a deep-fry or candy thermometer. Monitor the heat to keep a steady temperature. Using scissors or your hands, cut or pull a 2-to-3-inch piece of dough from the baking sheet and stretch it into a 4-to-5-inch circle, then lower it into the oil and fry, turning it frequently, just until golden brown on both sides and cooked through, 45 seconds to 1 1/2 minutes, depending on the size. Drain the doughnut on paper towels for 30 seconds and then toss in the cinnamon sugar. Repeat with the remaining dough. Devour warm.
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