Twinkie Bundt Cake

Twinkie Bundt Cake Recipe

This cake is essentially an enormous from-scratch version of the iconic American snack cake made with pronounceable ingredients. It’s golden and terrifically moist and its cream-filled cross section is an instant joy-inducer.–Shauna Sever

LC A Bundt Is A Bundt Is a Bundt? Note

Just as with a preservative-filled Twinkie, there’s a tunnel of sweet marshmallow crème love running through this dense, moist pound cake—though it doesn’t just magically appear. It’s the result of a little careful cake excavating involving fingertips and crumbs. While the result is quite civilized, the burrowing is not. For those of you with delicate sensibilities, may we suggest that you skip the Bundt pan in the recipe below and instead use 2 standard-size loaf pans? The result begets two giant Twinkies that not only call to mind childhood fantasies but are far, far easier to fill. (See the Variation below.) You can still satisfy your inner child, but with less mess for your grown-up self to clean up after. The only thing you may miss? Licking the filling from the wrapper.

Special Equipment: 12-cup Bundt pan

Twinkie Bundt Cake Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 25 M
  • 1 H, 35 M
  • Serves 12

Ingredients

  • For the cake
  • 6 tablespoons (3 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for the pan
  • 3 cups cake flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup mild vegetable oil, such as canola, grapeseed, safflower, or sunflower
  • 3 large eggs plus 4 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature
  • For the cream filling
  • 1 7.5-ounce jar marshmallow crème
  • 8 tablespoons (4 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting (optional)

Directions

  • Make the cake
  • 1. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 325°F (163°C). Coat a 12-cup Bundt pan with nonstick cooking spray or butter and dust it lightly with flour, tapping out any excess.
  • 2. Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl.
  • 3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter and vanilla on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar and beat until evenly mixed, about 1 minute. With the machine still running, slowly pour in the oil and beat until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs and egg yolks, 1 at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition.
  • 4. Reduce the mixer speed to low. Alternately stir in the flour mixture and buttermilk in 3 additions each, ending with the buttermilk. Mix on low speed just until the batter is smooth and no lumps remain. Turn off the mixer and gently fold the batter several times by hand with a spatula to ensure everything is incorporated. Pour the batter into the prepared pan.
  • 5. Bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until the cake is golden, the top springs back when lightly pressed, and a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Place the pan on a wire rack and let cool completely, about 2 hours.
  • Make the cream filling
  • 6. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together the marshmallow crème, butter, and vanilla until smooth. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a large round tip or spoon it into a large resealable plastic bag with a bottom corner snipped off.
  • 7. While the cake is still in the pan, use a paring knife or an apple corer to make 6 or 7 deep, evenly spaced notches or holes in the bottom of the cake, each about 3/4 of an inch in diameter, being careful to cut no more than halfway through to the top of the cake. Discard—that is, nibble—any cake scraps. Using your fingertips, gently forge a horizontal tunnel through the cake that connects the vertical holes.
  • 8. Insert the tip of the pastry or plastic bag into each hole and squeeze in some of the filling, tilting the bag back and forth as you work to encourage the filling to make its way into the horizontal tunnel. When the cake is filled, use a spatula to scrape away any excess filling from the bottom of the cake. Quickly and carefully invert the cake onto a platter. Dust with confectioners’ sugar, if desired. Slice and serve.

Giant Twinkies Variation

  • Follow the recipe but divide the batter between 2 buttered and floured 5-by-9-inch loaf pans. Bake for the same amount of time as directed above. After the cakes have cooled, gently turn them from the pans onto a work surface and turn them top-side up. You may need to loosen the sides of the cakes from the side of the pan with a knife. Starting at 1 short side of the cake, use a small serrated knife to carve a channel about 3/4 inch in diameter that runs through the cake to the other short side. Repeat on the other end, saving the end cake pieces to use as plugs and nibbling any crumbs from the inside of the cake. Pipe the cream filling into the center of the cake, then replace the cake plugs, if desired. Your end result should be 2 loaves, each with a channel of cream filling running through the center.
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Testers Choice

Testers Choice
Testers Choice
Sheri C.

Oct 03, 2012

A lovely, simple Bundt cake on its own, but the buttery marshmallow filling is a nice surprise. This is a very sweet cake. I love the texture—it’s not delicate, but hearty. I think this could easily serve 12. I used a 12-cup Bundt pan, although I think a 10-cup would be adequate.

Testers Choice
Tracey G.

Oct 03, 2012

I love recipes that recreate favorite childhood foods. Think of this as a highly elevated Twinkie. The vanilla flavor is pronounced. The cake itself was denser than I’d have preferred, as I was hoping for light and airy, not pound cake. But the marshmallow cream filling is amazing. I used a marshmallow cream that I found at Whole Foods made by Tiny Trapeze Confections. I think that next time I’d increase the number of holes in the cake to ensure that each bite has some filling with it.

Comments
Comments
  1. Mary says:

    Do you know the weight per cup of cake flour? I find I get much better results when I weigh…. If not, how did you get the flour into the measuring cup—fluff it up in the container then gently spoon into measuring cup and level? Or dip and sweep?
    Thanks!

    • Beth Price says:

      Hi Mary, I usually use King Arthur cake flour and the per cup weight equivalent is 4 1/4 ounces.

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