Braised Pork Loin with Rosemary

This braised pork loin with rosemary is a simple Sunday supper. Pork loin is studded with rosemary, seared with onion and garlic, and braised in wine until tender. A pan sauce of pork drippings, vinegar, olive oil, and mustard lends a nice acidity to the dish.

Braised pork loin with rosemary topped with a mustard-garlic sauce on a white plate on wood

“Pork loin is always delicious. But pork loin is even better when it’s simmered in wine.” That’s what one of our recipe testers had to say about this recipe that takes its flavor from rosemary as well as garlic, mustard, and wine.  Did we mention that making it is essentially effortless?–Angie Zoobkoff

Should braising liquid cover the meat?

Nope. When you’re braising anything, you only need it to come about a third of the way up the side of the meat. In this case, less truly is more, as the flavors and fat that exude from the pork or other cut of meat are released into the liquid and mingle to create a resulting pan sauce of astounding flavor. Too much liquid and that flavor would become diluted.

Braised Pork Loin with Rosemary

  • Quick Glance
  • (6)
  • 25 M
  • 2 H
  • Serves 4 to 6
5/5 - 6 reviews
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Ingredients


Directions

Cut or snip 1 sprig of rosemary into 1-inch (25-mm) sections and stick the cut rosemary sprigs into the meat at even intervals and tie the pork neatly with kitchen twine. Season the pork with salt and pepper. Remove the needles from the second sprig.

In a large braising pan or Dutch oven over medium heat, warm the butter and 4 tablespoons oil. Add the pork and cook, turning frequently, until golden brown on all sides, about 10 minutes. 

Add the garlic, onion, remaining rosemary, wine, salt, and pepper, cover, and gently simmer until tender, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Transfer the pork to a plate, loosely cover it, and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Stir the vinegar, 2 tablespoons oil, mustard, and a pinch of pepper into the cooking juices left in the pan. (If the cooking juices seem a little thin, first then let them simmer gently, uncovered, until reduced slightly and then add the vinegar, oil, mustard, and pepper.) Taste and adjust the seasoning accordingly.

Remove the kitchen twine from the pork, carve the meat into fairly thick slices, and place in a warm serving dish. Pour the sauce over the meat and serve. Originally published April 2, 2018.

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Recipe Testers' Reviews

Roast pork loin is always delicious. But pork loin is even better when it’s simmered in wine. Simple and flavorful. The roast turned out tender and perfectly done. The aroma of the onions and the wine filled the house and made it hard to wait for it to be cooked. Worth the wait. The meat was tender and perfect to slice. The sauce added another layer of flavor and was delicious on the roast and all the sides. A simple recipe to use any night of the week.

This is a great braised pork loin recipe for weekend dining or a weekday dinner if you have the time. The hands-on time was pretty minimal, most of it cutting or chopping and browning the roast. All in all, I love braised dishes that do most of the work for you. The pork was tender and moist. The vinegar added a bright note to the sauce and the mustard added a depth to the flavor.

The roast and rosemary sauce were so good that one taster (who isn't particularly fond of pork) went back for seconds. We served the roast with the pan sauce, simple mashed potatoes, a cucumber and tomato salad, and buttered asparagus.

HUNGRY FOR MORE?

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Comments

  1. This was delicious. Juicy with wonderful flavor. I will remove fat from gravy next time before serving or adjust to less olive oil.

    1. Me too because I’ve been so disappointed for so long I had stopped making pork tenderloin. I was convinced that the pork today just isn’t the same as 30 years ago.

  2. We made this tonight, and I’ve got to say not only is it easy, easy, easy, it’s fantastic. I love one-pot meals, so this was perfect. The pork loin was moist and flavorful, and the sauce–with its bit of acid from the vinegar and the depth the mustard offers–was great. I’m ashamed to say this served only 3 people…it was that good. Five milk bottles from all of us!

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