Mexican Bloody Mary

Two glasses filled with Mexican blood Mary, some lime wedges, a mostly empty bottle of Corona, and a bottle of Tabsco on its side.

This Mexican Bloody Mary recipe was given to me by my mate, Andy. During a cocktail party at my place, Andy, who’s worked in bars in the past, came up with this. It’s a take on a Bloody Mary, minus the vodka. Feel free to add tequila to the mix, too, if you like something a little stronger.–Katie Quinn Davies

LC A Bloody Mary By Any Other Name Note

Call this cocktail what you will—a Mexican Bloody Mary, a riff on a michelada, or a simple and satisfying tomato beer (doesn’t that sound like a version of beer pong in which college students use wee tomatoes in place of ping pong balls?). Though the cocktail is all of the above, it’s actually far more nuanced than any of these monikers lets on. So think of it what you will, but we like to think of it as our own personal picker upper come Sunday morning.

Mexican Bloody Mary

  • Quick Glance
  • Quick Glance
  • 5 M
  • 5 M
  • Serves 1
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Ingredients


Directions

Sprinkle some salt on a plate and spread out evenly. Rub a lime quarter around the rim of a glass, then dip the rim into the salt.

Add ice cubes to the glass and squeeze in some lime juice. Add the tomato juice, a couple dashes each Worcestershire sauce and Tabasco, and a little salt and pepper and stir well. Top the glass up with Corona, and continue to do so as you drink. If desired, tweak with more lime juice, Worcestershire, and/or hot sauce.

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Recipe Testers' Reviews

Yum! I love this riff on a michelada. I like that it works with beer or tequila or both, depending on your whim. However, the entire drink does not fit into one glass, so you must keep refilling and readjusting the flavors as you sip. I fit about 1/2 a Corona into my glass along with the rest of the ingredients. Once I was near the end, the ice had melted a bit, and the cocktail was sort of watery. To keep the flavors alive, I basically remade the drink again in order to finish off the beer. A bit more trouble than it's worth. However, when I made the drink the next night, I just added a big splash of tomato juice, the rest of the beer, and a shot of tequila to keep the second round interesting. With just tomato juice and Corona, it gets a little bit boring unless you bring out the big guns and opt for the tequila shot. I added the rest of the lime juice to the glass, so 3/4 of a lime juiced. The perfect amount of lime to carry through to the second glass. I used a scant 1/4 teaspoon Tabasco and a full 1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire. It was perfect, but I do like spicy, so others might want to start with 1/8 teaspoon Tabasco. This actually makes enough for 2 glasses. The second time I made it, I skipped the lime and condiments on the second glass, opted for another 3/4 cup tomato juice and 1/2 Corona, and added a shot of tequila to keep it spicy. Both versions were delicious and satisfying; it just depends how much work (i.e. getting out the condiments and cutting limes) you feel like doing.

This drink recipe was a snap to put together. In less than 5 minutes, I was drinking a cocktail that had a nice bite with a smooth finish. I used 2 squirts Worcestershire sauce, 3 drops Tabasco, and regular salt on the rim of the glass. A perfect drink on a summer evening.

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