Deviled eggs. They’re a crowd pleaser. Here we offer three varieties–classic, smoked salmon, and lightly truffled—so that everyone at your next gathering, whether they’re more conventional or a little less predictable—will be pleased.–Renee Schettler

How do I avoid a green ring around my egg yolks?

Ah, the gruesome green ring that circles the yolk. That occurs due to a reaction between the sulphur in the egg white and the iron in the yolk when you’ve cooked your eggs too long or at too high a temperature. Steaming your eggs will help to avoid the green ring because it’s gentler than furiously boiling them. An immediate plunge in ice water afterwards also helps stave off the green.

A plate with a trio of deviled eggs - horseradish deviled egg, truffled deviled egg, and smoked salmon deviled egg.

A Trio of Deviled Eggs

5 / 2 votes
Three types of deviled eggs—classic with horseradish, mustard, and paprika, truffled deviled eggs, and smoked salmon deviled eggs–make an excellent and enviable hors d’oeuvre for Easter dinner or any time you crave them.
David Leite
CourseAppetizers
CuisineAmerican
Servings12 deviled eggs
Calories63 kcal
Prep Time20 minutes
Total Time20 minutes

Ingredients 

For my mother’s deviled eggs

  • 6 large hard-boiled eggs, peeled and halved crosswise
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon prepared horseradish
  • Salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste
  • Pinch of celery salt, (optional)
  • Brandy to taste (optional)
  • Paprika, for serving

For the smoked salmon deviled eggs

  • 6 large hard-boiled eggs, peeled and halved crosswise
  • 1 tablespoon cream cheese
  • 2 ounces sliced smoked salmon, plus more for garnish
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon minced chives, plus more for garnish
  • 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste

For the truffled deviled eggs

  • 6 large hard-boiled eggs, peeled and halved crosswise
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon truffle oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste
  • Thinly slivered black truffles or 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives, for garnish

Instructions 

Make my mother’s deviled eggs

  • Place the yolks in a small bowl. Squash the yolks with the back of a fork. Then mash them with the mayonnaise, mustard, horseradish, salt, pepper, and, if desired, celery salt and a splash of brandy. Spoon the yolk mixture back into the egg whites. (If making deviled eggs ahead of time, cover them with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to use.)
  • Arrange the eggs on a serving plate and garnish each egg with a sprinkle of paprika, if desired.

Make the smoked salmon deviled eggs

  • Place the yolks in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Add the cream cheese, salmon, mayonnaise, chives, Worcestershire sauce, salt, and pepper to the yolks and blend until smooth. Spoon the vibrant salmon-colored yolk mixture back into the egg whites. If making deviled eggs ahead of time, cover them with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to use.
  • Arrange on a serving plate and garnish each egg with an additional sliver of salmon and if desired, snipped fresh chives.

Make the truffled deviled eggs

  • Place the yolks in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Add the mayonnaise, truffle oil, mustard, salt, and pepper to the yolks and blend until smooth. Spoon the yolk mixture back into the egg whites. If making deviled eggs ahead of time, cover them with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to use.
  • Arrange on a serving plate and garnish with the truffle or chives.

Video

Neiman Marcus Taste

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Nutrition

Serving: 1 half eggCalories: 63 kcalCarbohydrates: 1 gProtein: 3 gFat: 5 gSaturated Fat: 1 gMonounsaturated Fat: 2 gTrans Fat: 1 gCholesterol: 95 mgSodium: 57 mgFiber: 1 gSugar: 1 g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Tried this recipe?Mention @leitesculinaria or tag #leitesculinaria!
Recipe © 2007 Kevin Garvin. Photo © 2007 Ellen Silverman. All rights reserved.

Recipe Testers’ Reviews

Wow—what an elegant way to use those leftover Easter eggs! I tried two versions, and both were creamy and perfectly delicious.

The truffle deviled eggs were perfumed with the earthy scent of truffle oil. They were awesome. The smoked salmon deviled eggs were slightly salty and creamy—also awesome. We kept trying to decide which we liked the best, but it was hard to choose between them. With both of these recipes, deviled eggs have been elevated to hors d’oeuvre status.

One word: horseradish. I’ve made deviled eggs many times, but never thought to add horseradish. Not enough to be overwhelming or sharp, mind you. Just a touch for kick. My guests devoured these in record time. This recipe is a keeper.

I made “My Mother’s Version,” which resulted in plain-looking deviled eggs—but not plain-tasting deviled eggs! In addition to mustard and mayo, this recipe features horseradish, but not too much as to overpower the other flavors. I did add the brandy (and perhaps a bit more than a dash) to loosen the yolk mixture up a bit, as it was firmer than I like. The brandy wasn’t overpowering at all, and instead added a complexity to the eggs. You could tell there was something there, but it was hard to pinpoint what it was. Overall a very nice, well-balanced, yet slightly off-the-beaten-path, deviled egg.

I prefer to steam eggs rather than boil them. Put an inch or so of water in a pot, place a steamer basket over it, and bring to a boil. Add the eggs to the steamer, cover, and steam for 12 minutes. Remove eggs and place in an ice-water bath to cool. This method results in eggs that peel very easily, and never have discoloration around the yolk.

As we have an excellent organic egg supplier, I’ve been making a lot of variations of deviled eggs over the past few months. So I was happy to see this version containing, of all things, brandy. Both my husband and I were impressed with the delicious and balanced flavours. The horseradish gave the filling a lively kick, but it certainly wasn’t spicy or overpowering whatsoever. The brandy added a rich depth that really elevated the eggs. We also added the optional celery salt. Together with the traditional mustard powder, it made for an interesting and delicious combination!

I cooked the eggs for 7 minutes, and let them sit in the pot for 5 additional minutes. I drained them and allowed them to cool before peeling. This yielded a perfectly-cooked yolk—just right for mashing.

We’ll be eating a lot more of these in the future without a doubt. They’d make an excellent starter for guests, or a yummy picnic snack.




About David Leite

I count myself lucky to have received three James Beard Awards for my writing as well as for Leite’s Culinaria. My work has also appeared in The New York Times, Martha Stewart Living, Saveur, Bon Appétit, Gourmet, Food & Wine, Yankee, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, and more.


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Recipe Rating




3 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I made the smoked salmon deviled eggs to serve as an appetizer and I’m so glad that I did, they were delicious! Adding the smoked salmon to the mixture instead of just topping a deviled egg with salmon is genius! So simple to put together yet packed with so much flavour.

    1. Your photo looks fantastic, Aryn! We’re so glad you tried them and that they turned out so well.

  2. I still haven’t made up my mind on which recipe to choose, but I’ll be sure to use the magnificent milk mayonnaise, omitting garlic if necessary: it’s an easy way to cut down on eggs without cutting down on taste or creaminess.