Lemon-Scented Pull-Apart Coffee Cake

Lemon and cream cheese have long been classic companions in American baking, and this fun-to-assemble, sweet-tart filled coffee cake makes it easy to see why. Showcasing the lively flavors of fresh citrus, the sweet, buttery filling is made with fluffy, fragrant lemon and orange zest. The warm loaf is brushed with a zippy cream cheese icing, whose tangy flavor marries marvelously with the sunny taste of citrus. Enjoy a slice of this pull-apart coffee cake whenever you need a pick-me-up.–Flo Braker

LC Huzzahs! Note

Still not convinced? Here’s what folks are saying about this sweetly tart, citrusy cake: “It was absolutely the best thing I’ve put in my mouth in a long time.” “Incredible.” “Perfect.” “Huzzahs!”

Lemon-Scented Pull-Apart Coffee Cake Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 1 H
  • 3 H, 45 M
  • Makes one 9-by-5-inch cake; 14 servings

Ingredients

  • For the sweet dough
  • About 2 3/4 cups (12 1/4 ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup (1 3/4 ounces) granulated sugar
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons (1 envelope) instant yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup whole milk
  • 4 tablespoons (2 ounces) unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • For the lemon filling
  • 1/2 cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons finely grated lemon zest (from 2 to 3 lemons, preferably organic)
  • 1 tablespoons finely grated orange zest, preferably organic
  • 2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
  • For the cream cheese icing
  • 3 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1/3 cup (1 1/4 ounces) confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tablespoon whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

Directions

  • Make the sweet dough
  • 1. Stir together 2 cups (9 ounces) of the flour, sugar, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer. In a small saucepan, heat the milk and butter over low heat just until the butter is melted. Remove from the heat, add the water, and set aside until warm (120 to 130°F [49 to 54°C]), about 1 minute. Add the vanilla extract.
  • 2. Pour the milk mixture over the flour-yeast mixture and, using a rubber spatula, mix until the dry ingredients are evenly moistened. Attach the bowl to the mixer, and fit the mixer with the paddle attachment. With the mixer on low speed, add the eggs, 1 at a time, mixing jjust until incorporated after each addition. Stop the mixer, add 1/2 cup (2 1/4 ounces) flour, and resume mixing on low speed until the dough is smooth, 30 to 45 seconds. Add 2 more tablespoons flour and mix on medium speed until the dough is smooth, soft, and slightly sticky, about 45 seconds.
  • 3. Sprinkle a work surface with 1 tablespoon flour and turn the dough onto the flour. Knead gently until the dough is smooth and no longer sticky, about 1 minute, adding an additional 1 to 2 tablespoons flour only if the dough is unworkably sticky. Place the dough in a large bowl, cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap, and let the dough rise in a warm place (about 70°F [21°C]) until doubled in size, 45 to 60 minutes. Press the dough gently with a fingertip. If the indentation remains, the dough is ready for the next step.
  • Make the lemon filling
  • 4. While the dough is rising, in a small bowl, mix together the sugar, lemon zest, and orange zest. Set aside. (The sugar draws out moisture from the zests to create a sandy-wet consistency, so don’t be alarmed when you see this.)
  • Assemble the coffee cake
  • 5. Adjust the oven rack to the center position and preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Lightly butter a 9-by-5-by-3-inch loaf pan.
  • 6. Gently deflate the dough. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a 20-by-12-inch rectangle. Using a pastry brush, spread the melted butter generously over the dough. Cut the dough crosswise into 5 strips, each about 12 by 4 inches. (A pizza cutter is helpful here.) Sprinkle 1 1/2 tablespoons of the zest-sugar mixture over a buttered rectangle. Top with a second rectangle and sprinkle it with 1 1/2 tablespoons of the zest-sugar mixture. Repeat with the remaining dough rectangles and zest-sugar mixture, ending with a stack of 5 rectangles. Work carefully when adding the crumbly zest filling, or it will fall off when you have to lift the stacked pastry later.
  • 7. Slice the stack crosswise through the 5 layers to create 6 equal strips, each about 4 by 2 inches. Fit these layered strips into the prepared loaf pan, cut edges up and side by side. (While there is plenty of space on either side of the 6 strips widthwise in the pan, fitting the strips lengthwise is tight. But that’s fine because the spaces between the dough and the sides of the pan fill in during baking.) Loosely cover the pan with plastic wrap and let the dough rise in a warm place (70 °F [21°C]) until puffy and almost doubled in size, 30 to 50 minutes. Press the dough gently with a fingertip. If the indentation remains, the dough is ready for baking.
  • 8. Bake the coffee cake until the top is golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool in the pan for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Make the cream cheese icing
  • 9. In a medium bowl with a rubber spatula, vigorously mix the cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Beat in the milk and lemon juice until the mixture is creamy and smooth.
  • 10. To remove the coffee cake from the pan, tilt and rotate the pan while gently tapping it on a counter to release the cake sides. Invert a wire rack on top of the coffee cake, invert the cake onto the rack, and carefully lift off the pan. Invert another rack on top, invert the cake so it is right side up, and remove the original rack.
  • 11. Slip a sheet of waxed paper under the rack to catch any drips from the icing. Using a pastry brush, coat the top of the warm cake with the icing to glaze it. (Cover and refrigerate the leftover icing for another use. It will keep for up to 2 days.)
  • 12. Serve the coffee cake warm or at room temperature. To serve, you can pull apart the layers, or you can cut the cake into 1-inch-thick slices on a slight diagonal with a long, serrated knife. If you decide to cut the cake, don’t attempt to cut it until it is almost completely cool.
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Testers Choice

Testers Choice
Testers Choice
Adrienne Lee

Dec 08, 2009

This is an advanced recipe in terms of construction. Is it worth it? Yes. Because the bread dough is made with milk and butter, it retains a very soft, beautiful texture. The pull-apart aspect is a lot of fun and the resulting bread, with and without the cream cheese glaze, is lovely. The smell throughout my house was fantastic. I love the citrus tones. I might skip the cream cheese frosting in the future in favor of a lighter one.

In spite of how good the bread is, I do have a few baking notes:

1. Read the recipe all the way through so that you understand all the steps before starting. (Mise en place helps, too.) The construction phase is a bit more complicated than a simple monkey bread or even a simple cinnamon roll.

2. Make sure you have really fresh yeast, otherwise you may have trouble. The recipe does not contain a proofing period before adding all the other ingredients.

3. I used more flour because the texture was too sticky. So, you may need more flour (or you may need only what’s in the recipe). If you don’t include enough flour, though, there won’t be enough structure for later.

4. I had to draw a diagram of the cutting in order to have it make sense. You may want to draw a rectangle with the cutting in order to see the dimensions more clearly. The resulting smaller rectangles (4-by-2 inches) are delicate, especially with the filling. I turned my loaf pan on its side (short side down) and stacked gently.

5. When I repeat this recipe, I’ll likely line the pan with parchment. The bread took a bit of coaxing to remove from the pan. (I ran a knife around the sides and then used a spatula to coax it.)

6. The recipe asks you to remove the cake/bread when it is golden. This does not necessarily mean that the inside has completed cooking. The minimum internal temperature for breads is 185°F but 190°F for this bread would be better. (The maximum would be around 199°F to 200°F.)

Testers Choice
Karla Cyr

Dec 08, 2009

Baking with citrus can be delicious. This Lemon-Scented Pull-Apart Coffee Cake is a must-have for Easter, or any springtime breakfast or brunch. It has all the elements of a prized sweet bread, with drizzles of cream-cheese frosting over a buttery rich interior. Who can resist? Each bite has flecks of fragrant lemon and orange zest in it, uniting all the flavors of the bread perfectly. Be patient with this recipe, though. Cutting and stacking layers of dough is a technique that departs from forming it into a traditional loaf. But the look is unique, and the taste…simply lemonlicious!

This yeast-based coffee cake reminds me of some specialty rolls I made–using a recipe from a Betty Crocker cookbook–called Butter Fluffs (aka Fan Tans), which are made in much the same way this coffee cake is created and assembled. In this recipe, however, the yeast is proofed directly with the dry ingredients. This is a technique that works very well and allows the yeast to thrive in the warm (120°F) liquid and carbohydrate-rich batter.

The lemon-paste filling helps liven up the bread with its fresh flavors, the zest in particular picking up the sweet tang in the cream-cheese frosting and bringing all the flavors of the bread into harmony. The amount of sugar in the recipe also creates a comforting balance of sweetness. Much of the sweetness comes from the sugar in the dough, which helps produce a striking golden-colored loaf. However, added sugar from the paste also melts into the bread as it bakes.

As the recipe states, the dough had a slightly sticky, tacky feel after I first made it, and even after it doubled in size. Therefore, I added 6 extra tablespoons of flour to help compensate for the extra moisture lingering in the dough.

Once I relearned the technique of cutting and stacking dough into layers (as instructed in the Fan Tan recipe), the assembly process went together rather smoothly. Within 30 minutes of proofing, the layers of dough had squeezed together and rose above the rim of the pan to produce staggered peaks and valleys. When baked, the bread turned an eye-fetching golden color and set off the white-colored frosting so well.

When I ran a knife around the bread to loosen it, it slid right out of the pan without struggle. It pulled apart easily and made for an unforgettable treat.

Comments
Comments
  1. I used this dough to make an apricot-orange yeasted coffee cake. DELISH!

  2. Hanaa says:

    I made this over the weekend, and it’s AMAZING. Everybody who tried it, loved it. The bread part is light and very soft. The citrus infusion is wonderful. And I also loved the tangy glaze on top. A winner, for sure!!

    • Renee Schettler Rossi, LC Editor-in-Chief says:

      Lovely to hear that you had the same experience as we did, Hanaa. Thanks for letting us know.

    • Flo Braker says:

      Thank you so much. Your remarks mean a lot to me. All best, Flo Braker

  3. Karen says:

    Made this a few weeks ago – it was FABULOUS. Thought about it after it was gone for a few more weeks! Bought the cookbook.

    • Flo Braker says:

      Karen, thank you so much. Your remarks mean the world to me. And so nice of you to buy the book. All my best, Flo Braker

  4. Charlene says:

    This looks scrumptious! How is this on day 2 or 3? If one wanted to prepare the night before and refrigerate to bake in the morning, would you refrigerate it immediately after assembly or allow the final rise first?

    • Flo Braker says:

      Charlene, I’d refrigerate it after assembly, then remove it from the fridge about an hour before baking and allow it to rise at room temperature….(loosely cover the top with plastic wrap). Since I have not tested this theory…perhaps leave more time than an hour to rise until slightly puffy. However, it will probably rise a bit overnight.) As it bakes it it will rise more. Great question, thank you so much, and good luck. Warm regards, Flo Braker

      • Charlene says:

        Flo, thanks so much for sharing this recipe and your reply to my question. It sounds like it would be great for brunch is why I asked. I hope to make it soon. All the best to you!

  5. Flo Braker says:

    Adrienne, I much appreciate your Testers Choice comments!!! Thank you so much. I’ve made note of everything you’ve said. All my best, Flo Braker

  6. Flo Braker says:

    Karla, I much appreciate your Testers Choice comments. I’m very partial to lemon flavor in yeast coffee cakes. All my best, Flo Braker

  7. David Leite says:

    Flo—Thank you for your time and for visiting us and replying to so many of our readers. It’s much appreciated.

  8. Susanne says:

    I miss the measurements in grams. I got used to those in The Simple Art of Perfect Baking. Are the weight measurements in grams in the book?

    In any case, this looks good. I’ll give it a try today.

  9. Whitney says:

    I loved the look of this cake when I saw the photo and less than 24 hours later I had to bake one. Here are my notes:

    - thanks to the previous posters as I did add some extra flour to the dough as well.
    - I used a mix of white and natural sugar.
    - OK, I admit I was distracted as I’m baking a birthday cake too but I melted the butter for the lemon paste filling and put everything together in one bowl. Surprisingly, it made for easy application and I spread it out with a small spatula. Absolutely no trouble moving the rectangles around and nothing fell out.
    - The cream cheese icing went into a squeeze bottle so it is nicely drizzled over the top.

    Thank you for posting such a great recipe.

    • Renee Schettler Rossi, LC Editor-in-Chief says:

      You’re welcome, Whitney. Thank you for your copious and wonderfully detailed notes. Tremendously helpful for those of us making it next…

  10. Camille says:

    Words cannot describe my love for this bread. Although mine kind of overflowed the baking tin, and the edges therefore browned more than the inside of the bread, it made it even better by enhancing the flavor with a slight crunch on the ends.

    I’ve never made bread before, but this turned out absolutely perfect, so don’t be worried by “advanced construction”; if you read through the recipe a couple of times, you should be fine.

    New favorite. Of all time.

    • David Leite says:

      Flo Braker is not only a friend but one of the finest bakers and baking authors out there. Her recipes work, hands down. I love this recipe. So glad you do, too.

  11. Susan says:

    I printed this recipe out months ago and finally got around to making it last night. I wish I had come back in to read the helpful hints (especially the one about turning the pan on end to stack the rectangles). Reading the recipe about 3 times before making, did make a difference. I was able to picture the end result of step, making it easier in the long run. I am making this again with tangerines and finely chopped hazelnuts for Thanksgiving.

  12. rainey says:

    I’m preparing this now. It looks and sounds wonderful. I’m hopeful that I can pull it off.

    I have read the assembly through several times on the suggestion of the first commenter. I think I’m clear about cutting, stacking and recutting the dough. I am NOT clear about how the pieces go into the loaf pan. The best guess I can make is that the 4″ dimension goes from side to side and the 2″ dimensions stack across the length of the pan. Is this correct? Or is it altogether something different?

    Some photos of the assembly would be most helpful.

    Thanks in advance for clarification.

    • David Leite says:

      Hi, rainey. Imagine that the 4-by-2-inch pieces of dough are index cards and you’re arranging them in the short end of the pan, like cards in a long recipe box or index cards in those long drawers in the old-fashioned library card catalog system. The pieces are tucked in, from front to back , each slice placed behind the previous one, with the 4-inch edge along the bottom and the 2-inch edges on the left and right side. You’ll have a bit of space on the left and right side of the pieces, but they fill in when the dough rises and bakes. Hope this helps.

  13. rainey says:

    Thanks for the explanation. When I tried the recipe and had the dough in front of me the assembly was not all that hard to figure out. But I have added photos of each stage of construction to my own recipe database.

    I think this coffee cake has lovely flavor and texture but I have to say that it took me 3 passes at it to get anything I wouldn’t be completely embarrassed to serve. It appears others before me did not have any appearance problems but, despite having good experienced in working with yeast doughs, my first attempt was nothing short of grotesque and falling apart. My second was much more attractive served upside down than right side up.

    When I used the 9″x5″x3″ pan specified my specific problems were 1) it was much too small and 2) the actual baking time by temperature (approx. 195?) was considerably longer than the 30-35 minutes specified and the top was, as a result, very brown indeed rather than the soft golden color in the photo illustration.

    I was finally able to get a reasonably attractive though still very dark loaf using a 9″x4″x4″ pan that resembles a Pullman pan. Pictures of each are at the following links. Note that the second and third efforts have fillings of streusel and ground sweet chocolate plus espresso powder as I wasn’t willing to devote so much fresh citrus as each required. That said, the citrus does make this coffee cake more unusual, fresh and delicious. I will be making the citrus filling when I make this again for serving to friends and company.

    First effort:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/75667634@N00/5306959317/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/75667634@N00/5307032215/

    Second effort:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/75667634@N00/5314425388/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/75667634@N00/5313820277/

    Third effort:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/75667634@N00/5340767901/

    Can you tell what I’m doing wrong? Thanks in advance.

  14. Flo Braker says:

    Rainey, I’m in love with your precious baby’ s photo! I’m a devoted Grandmother…and so lucky to have my whole family less than 20 minutes from where we live.

    NOW, for the pull-apart recipe. Bless you for your persistence! I am so impressed with you. The last photo looks fabulous. And it appears that this pan was best for baking it….the slices in this photo seem to be thinner (less dough for each slice) which is what you want. If you use the lemon filling just bake it longer…and perhaps reduce the temperature of oven toward the end of baking to give the dough time to bake through (since the filling might be more moist than your mocha variation)

    Call me and I’ll happily talk about this with you anytime. (You cna ask David for my number.) I’ll return your call so you won’t have to pay. Thank you so much for buying my book and for your feedback. It means the world to me. Also thanks to David for his kind assistance in forming this coffee cake….He is “THE BEST!” Enjoy your family….they grow up fast!!

    xoox,

    Flo Braker

  15. rainey says:

    WOW! How kind of you to offer that help.

    Yes, I’d love to take advantage of it because it’s a very nice loaf/cake with great flavor and texture and I’d like very much to work out my skills to be able to serve it proudly. Yours is so beautiful and that’s what initially prompted me to try it. The fresh flavor and tender texture are what convinced me I have to master this.

    I’ll try to find out how to contact David.

    • David Leite says:

      Rainey,

      I understand that you and Flo spoke. Was it helpful? And will be marching on with the recipe? Inquiring minds want to know.

      • rainey says:

        Nope, haven’t talked yet. I still need to get her phone number and she said you’d be able to pass it along to me…only I haven’t been able to determine how to reach you privately where you could exchange her info.

        Thanks in advance for your help.

        rainey

  16. rachel says:

    I just made this today. I had half a recipe of croissant dough leftover from yesterday and decided to use that but otherwise I followed the rest of the recipe. Amazing. One of the most satisfying baked goods I’ve ever pulled out of my oven! This style of pull-apart is hugely popular in parts of Asia where it appears in some of the best food hall bakeries and is made in both savory and sweet forms. It never occurred to me how they achieved the result until I saw the picture of this loaf. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe.

  17. My friend Joan sent me a box of fresh lemons and oranges from her backyard and at the recommendation of a Facebook friend I’m about to make this coffee cake for the first time. I don’t have the right size loaf pan, and I’m so not what you could call an experienced baker (I was raised on Bisquik). Would this recipe work in a bundt pan?

    • David Leite says:

      Dana, we never like to have readers buy equipment, but in this case I think it’s essential. So much depends upon the pan, proper rising times, etc. In the end, you’ll be glad you did.

  18. Susan Buentello says:

    I have had this recipe in my “to make” folder for ages, and just made it today. Why, oh why did I wait?? It was absolutely the best thing I’ve put in my mouth in a long time. It came out perfectly as written–though I did make the dough on the dough setting of my bread machine. I love this recipe!!

    • David Leite says:

      Susan, it’s such a winner, isn’t it? I love this cake. And, hey, bread machine or not–it worked, right?

  19. I took your advice, David, and bought the pan. I’ve made the recipe twice now, and it worked both times, even when I screwed up the directions the first time. Couldn’t believe it. Loud “Huzzahs!” from everyone in my knitting group who got it for breakfast on Saturday morning and the guy who came over for dinner last who got it for dessert. I’m linking this recipe to my Facebook page and to my food blog with two thumbs way up.

  20. Sherri says:

    Do you think this could be doubled and baked in an angel food pan? I’m tempted to try it for Easter brunch.

    • David Leite says:

      Hi, Sherri. I think it’s best to follow the instructions. Easter is only a few days away, and the last thing you want to do is experiment and then have a problem. Why not make two lovely loaves?

  21. Nancy says:

    Hello!

    I would like to make this but unwaxed lemons and oranges are hard to come by, would using orange marmalade be a good substitute??

    Novice Baker Nancy

    • Renee Schettler Rossi, LC Editor-in-Chief says:

      Hello, Nancy! The sugar and pectin and moisture of the marmalade will, we fear, throw off the precise proportions of the batter and hence alter your results. Safer to buy waxed citrus and just scrub them under hot water with a vegetable brush…

  22. Kirsten Leah says:

    This is circulating Pinterest, so I’m imagining more and more people will be trying it! I took pictures of your steps 6 and 7, in case people need a visual and posted them here: This recipe is INCREDIBLE. Thank you, thank you.

    • David Leite says:

      Kirsten, you’re welcome. And thank you for the images.

      Note: Readers, Kirsten used a wider pan than Flo Braker, the creator of the recipe, calls for. If you use the specified loaf pan, you’d have one row of slices. Of course, you can always use a wider pan and do as Kirsten does. No harm, no foul.

  23. Sarah says:

    I made this tonight, and it was absolutely golden and wonderful and turned out just like I wanted it to.
    I used my Cephalon non-stick pan AND sprayed it, and had no issues with it sticking at all.

    As usual, if one follows the instructions closely, it turns out great. Thanks for a wonderful recipe for the arsenal.

    • Renee Schettler Rossi, LC Editor-in-Chief says:

      You’re more than welcome, Sarah! This is one of the most insanely popular recipes on the site–for obvious reasons. We look forward to hearing which recipe on the site you try next…

  24. Anna says:

    Thanks so much for this wonderful recipe, Flo! I made this tonight, but my yeast was off — the dough barely rose. It yielded a much tougher, not quite so flakey, but still very delicious bread. I’ll have to test the temperature of my milk, and let the eggs come to room temperature. It was a cold day, and our heat is broken, so I have a feeling that had something to do with it.

    I’m looking forward to trying it again!

    • Renee Schettler Rossi, LC Editor-in-Chief says:

      Sounds as if the fates were contriving against you, Anna. Yes, please try it again and do let us know how it goes….

  25. Christine says:

    Has anyone tried making this without a standup Kitchen Aid mixer? I don’t have one but I’d love to try this for a colleague’s birthday.

    • Beth Price, LC Director of Recipe Testing says:

      Hi Christine,

      This is such a lovely treat. I asked Adrienne, one of our testers who made the coffee cake, what she thought about your question. This is her reply “Any bread dough can be made by hand.  You’d just follow the same procedure BUT you’d have to make sure that you mix thoroughly.  The dough might be difficult and heavy and then might get difficult and sticky.  So, mixing thoroughly might get difficult as time goes on.  Try not to mix in too much flour in the process so that the bread doesn’t become too tough.” Let us know if you try making it by hand.

  26. M. Rousset says:

    I mixed the dough by hand… It took a bit of sweat and elbow grease, but after all was said and done it came out great! I would recomend stirring the dough from the top with a spatula then doing it with your hands old-school style. The end result was phenom…. Thanks for putting this out there.

    • David Leite says:

      M. Rousset, so glad it came out well. We’ll keep sussing out the best recipes–each of which are tested by our team of 150 discerning and demanding cooks–if you keep making them!

  27. tammy holowicki says:

    I notice that the measurements don’t match i.e. 2 3/4 cups flour does not equal 12 1/4 ounces very confusing do you go with the cup measurement or the ounce??? There are 8 ounces in a cup so 2 3/4 cups would actually be 22 ounces not 12 1/4 ounces and it’s like that the whole way through…

    • David Leite says:

      Hello, tammy. I see the problem here. The ounces refer to weight, not liquid. Two and one half cups of liquid are indeed 22 ounces. But if you weigh 2 3/4 cups of flour (using the dip and sweep method), you get 12 1/4 weight ounces. If you don’t have a scale, go with the cup measurement, making sure to use the dip and sweep method. For that, simply stir the flour with a knife then dip in the cup. The flour will be slightly mounded on top of the cup, so use the back of the knife to sweep off the excess flour. Then you have the perfect amount.

      • Belles AZ says:

        And, not all flours weigh out the same. AP flour and Bread flour weigh slightly differently when you’re weighing a cup of each. And cake flour? That’s a whole different breed of cat! Best bet, if you’re at all interested in precision baking, invest in a good, electronic scale with a tare function and one that measures both ounces and grams. There are good ones on Amazon and also at stores like Bed, Bath and Beyond.

  28. Meike says:

    Hi, can I use breadmaker to knead and proof the dough?

    • David Leite says:

      Meike, I never used one nor have any of our testers, so none of us can speak from experience. But if you’ve use a breadmaker to knead and proof other specialty doughs, I don’t see why it couldn’t work for this one.

  29. Mandy says:

    I made this last night and it was delicious! I wasn’t able to follow the recipe exactly (rise times, no oranges on hand), but even with the extra long 1st rise, it was awesome! Due to our high elevation, I added quite a bit of extra flour to the dough in the stand mixer before I was able to handle it and also baked it at 365 deg. I had extra melted butter, which I drizzled over the top of the bread before the last rise. I think this helped it release from the pan, because I didn’t have any issues with it sticking. However, I did need a cookie sheet under the bread pan to catch those random butter drips and a foil cover was necessary during the last 10 min of baking.
    It came out perfect (for us), crispy outside and the center was about 190 deg. and so moist. AWESOME! Thank you for a great recipe!

    • David Leite David Leite says:

      Mandy, how wonderful!! I’m thrilled it worked for you. Flo Braker is a great baker and cookbook writer. And, as you discovered, her food is awesome.

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