Nancy Drew Blondies

Nancy Drew Blondies Recipe

This Nancy Drew blondies recipe is named after the teenage detective in the series of mystery novels that my mother read as a child. In the movie starring Emma Roberts, Nancy Drew used these treats as a tool of bribery; though they make great bribes, these are just as perfect for sharing. The original Nancy Drew blondies, as I’ve found out, are only flecked with walnuts. Surely you can go that route with this recipe; however, I also like to stir milk chocolate chips and white chocolate chips into the batter, which make for irresistible blondies worthy of sharing and even bribing.

The secret to the moistness of this blondies recipe is the cold egg; if you prefer a blondie that’s a little less moist and a little more cakey, use a room-temperature egg and briefly beat it with a whisk before adding it to the batter. Once the batter is ready to be baked, tag on a couple more minutes oven time. I prefer to cut these into 36 blondies, as they’re quite rich.–Kamran Siddiqi

LC Not The Blondies Of Your Childhood Note

These are not the blondies of your childhood. These are even better. They’re rich, chewy, butterscotch-y, and even chocolatey thanks to the addition of chocolate chips. They don’t remain as discrete chips, though, since you stir them into the warm batter, which makes for lovely swirls of molten chocolateness. If you prefer your blondies on the not-terribly-sweet end of the sweet spectrum, opt for semisweet or dark chocolate chips and omit the white chocolate.

Now forget, for a moment, this Nancy Drew blondies recipe and contemplate instead its namesake. If the name Nancy Drew means nothing to you and has you wondering, “Who?” then get your millennial patootie to the library—either in person or online—and reserve or download some of the books in the series. Or at least take a twirl through Google and see what she’s about. Consider it homework for when you sit down with these blondies, which exceeded our testers’ expectations in a very big way—and they may just do the same for you. But be careful—no batter spatters on that library book or you’re in trouble.

Nancy Drew Blondies Recipe

  • Quick Glance
  • 10 M
  • 45 M
  • Makes 16 to 36

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons (85 grams) unsalted butter, cold
  • 1 cup (200 grams) packed light brown sugar or muscovado sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 large egg, cold
  • 1 cup (120 grams) whole-wheat pastry flour or all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup (85 grams) milk or semisweet or dark chocolate chips or chunks
  • 1/2 cup (85 grams) white chocolate chips or chunks (if you don’t want super sweet blondies, substitute more milk or semisweet or dark chocolate)
  • 1/3 cup (35 grams) walnuts, lightly toasted and roughly chopped (optional)

Directions

  • 1. Position a rack in the upper third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Line an 8-inch (20-centimeter) square baking pan with parchment paper or aluminum foil, leaving an overhang around each side.
  • 2. In a medium saucepan, melt the butter over low heat. Remove the saucepan from the heat and with a wooden spoon or sturdy silicone spatula, mix in the brown sugar, vanilla, and salt until relatively smooth. Quickly stir in the egg and mix until smooth and lump-free. Add the flour, chocolate chips, and walnuts (if using) all at once. Stir the mixture until just incorporated. Spread the batter evenly in the prepared pan.
  • 3. Bake for 23 to 30 minutes, until the blondies are golden and crinkly on top, set in the middle, and a toothpick or cake tester plunged into the center comes out clean or with just a few stray crumbs attached.
  • 4. Let the blondies cool completely in the pan. (Hah! We know the temptation. Trust us, we know. Still, try to wait.) Lift the ends of the parchment and transfer the blondies to a cutting board. Cut the block into 16, 25, or 36 squares. The blondies will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days.

T-shirt Variation

  • Blondies Without Chocolate
  • T-shirt variationIf you’re not in the mood for milk or white chocolate, you can leave it out and increase the amount of walnuts to 1 cup (105 grams). If you’re not into walnuts, either, use pecans or any kind of nut you feel to be appropriate.
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Recipe Testers Reviews

Dawn English

Jan 31, 2015

I thought this blondies recipe would be good, but I was not expecting it to be THIS good. When I saw the recipe, I had to make it. First, I am a huge Nancy Drew fan, and second, I love blondies but rarely make them. This recipe is so easy to make, and it only requires dirtying one pot to whip up the batter, which I loved! The ingredients come together extremely quickly once the butter is melted. I used 1/2 cup chopped bittersweet Valrhona bar and 2/3 cup chopped walnuts and regular all-purpose flour. These blondies are buttery and not too sweet with a nice, moist texture. I found that 36 squares makes for an incredibly small serving, and even though these are rich, 16 blondies seems more reasonable. I’m glad I found this recipe.

Pat Francis

Jan 31, 2015

I read the Nancy Drew mysteries as a child many years ago, and I also liked to make butterscotch brownies, although I’m not sure if there's any connection between the two. Butterscotch has always been a favorite of mine (I prefer it to chocolate—blasphemously, I suppose). Having not baked or eaten blondies in years, I gave this blondies recipe a try, unsure about how it would turn out. I don’t recall ever adding chocolate to blondies before, and I’m not even certain about the nuts. But this recipe exceeded my expectations. The batter seemed almost like fudge going into the pan (coincidentally, I used the ancient pan my mother always used for her box-mix brownies), but the texture turned out just right. After 30 minutes in the oven, the blondies were a bit crinkled on the top, just the way I like brownies, and a few crumbs came off the toothpick used for testing doneness. The blondies might have been done a few minutes before that, but knowing my oven’s quirks, I waited 30 minutes to check for doneness. The chocolate chips, which melted and swirled a bit after being whisked into the hot mixture, were a nice accent to the buttery brown sugar base. The chocolate chips were somewhat visible in the final product but not distinct in flavor; they certainly added to the sweetness.

Not wanting too big a hit of sugar and calories, I cut these into 36 pieces. Each piece is (was!) a modest but entirely satisfying couple bites. They are very sweet and rich, and smaller seems the way to go in terms of size. I might like to try making these only with walnuts, as they pair well with the butterscotch flavor. I used whole-wheat pastry flour in this, which worked great. I lined the pan with parchment, which I found hard to keep in place until the pan was filled. The liner worked great for getting them out of the pan. Next time I’ll use foil. There was a bit of variance when weighing the brown sugar (I got 214g instead of 200g) and pastry flour (I measured 130g in 1 cup instead of 120g).

Kara Vitek

Jan 31, 2015

This blondies recipe was so easy to make and tasted so delicious. I sort of cheated and melted my butter in the microwave to make the batter a one-bowl operation. I used light brown sugar and all-purpose flour as that was all I had on hand. I look forward to trying the whole-wheat version next time. I only had milk chocolate chips and so this is what I used along with pecans. I can't wait to try these with white chocolate! The hands-on time was approximately 9 minutes and the baking time was 27 minutes. I was eager to cut the blondies while they were still warm, but found that the flavor seemed to develop more once they were completely cool. I liked the slight hardness to the crust and the chewiness of the middle, which was achieved by using a cold egg. I cut these into 25 squares and think this size is perfect! I like this blondies recipe better than my old one as it's not too, too sweet. However, next time I'll add more salt as I found this blondie a bit bland. I hope you will enjoy this as much as me. It was a perfect treat for a snow day!

Erin W.

Jan 31, 2015

How many minutes does it take a den of cub scouts to DEVOUR a pan of these blondies? Just 3 1/2 minutes. I timed them. I couldn't help but notice the parents gladly helping out and polishing them off, too! I wouldn't change a thing with this blondies recipe, though I did have to improvise on the flour since I didn't have the whole-wheat pastry flour on hand; instead I used 1/2 regular flour and 1/2 whole-wheat flour. I especially liked that you cook them up in a single saucepan.

Mackenzie Campbell

Jan 31, 2015

I don't normally opt for baking, however, I found myself stuck inside this morning and hopelessly bored after the first 2 hours. I happened to have all the ingredients for these blondies in my pantry and so I gave it a go. They only took about 10 minutes to prepare. I love that you melt the butter before mixing in the sugar instead of having to lug out the mixer to cream the 2 ingredients together. I used all-purpose flour. According to the recipe description, the original recipe only had walnuts, and so that's what I did. I used 1 cup of chopped, toasted walnuts. I don't think these need chocolate chips of any kind, but if you ABSOLUTELY need some, I think dark chocolate would keep things from getting too sweet. The dough was pretty sticky and very chunky and it was slightly difficult to spread it in the pan evenly. Once in the oven, the blondies took about 35 minutes before they passed the toothpick test (however, my oven usually takes a bit longer than recipes specify.) The blondies came out rich, chewy, dense, and delicious.

Victoria Filippi

Jan 31, 2015

Delicious! I love a great recipe with very little clean up. My hands-on time was less than 10 minutes. The flavor and chewiness from the butter and brown sugar makes these a treat you want to make again and again. I used white chocolate pieces, dark chocolate chips, and toasted pecans instead of walnuts and the blondies were done ro perfection in 23 minutes. I cut them into 20 pieces, which I feel is the perfect size. I think they will be even more sinful with a scoop of vanilla ice cream! I think I'll try that tonight!

Karen Lynch

Jan 31, 2015

Blondies have always been a childhood favorite. After reading the recipe for Nancy Drew blondies I knew I had to make these for 2 reasons. The first is that I grew up with the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew and nostalgia is always a great motivator. The second reason is I do not remember the blondie version I grew up with having chocolate in them—I think a different chip was used, though I do remember them having nuts for a while until my sister proclaimed she didn't like nuts. I used all-purpose flour and both white and milk chocolate chips along with walnuts. The ease of the recipe is great—no having to wait until the butter or egg comes to room temperature, so when you decide to make this blondies recipe you can start at once. I also loved the parchment paper lining, which made lifting the blondies out of the pan easy once they had cooled. A tip about waiting for the butter mixture to cool a little might be a nice tip for the inexperienced cook who might end up with the egg cooking a little. This would also help with chocolate not being to warm and melting while mixing in. The were blondies baked perfectly at 25 minutes, and I cut them into 25 squares, which seemed a good snack size. The flavor was good but too sweet for our preference. This was probably be due to the white chocolate. If I make them again, I will increase the walnuts and eliminate the white chocolate.

Victoria Morgan

Jan 31, 2015

I made this fantastic blondies recipe for a Superbowl party that I'm attending this weekend, but I don't know if the blondies will actually make it until Sunday—they are just too tasty! I made a batch with the walnuts and then a second batch in which I substituted coconut flakes because there are a few nut allergies present at the party. The walnuts work great with the flavors in this recipe and add a really nice crunch to the gooey bar. I was worried that I would miss the crunch with the coconut, but the result was a pleasant surprise. The coconut flakes really complemented the white chocolate chips! I cut mine into approximately 20 pieces, but it all depends what size bars you want. Enjoy with a glass of milk, if at all possible, or a cup of tea—both are great to pair with these. Actually, I think I'm going to go have another blondie right now…!

Chiyo Ueyama

Jan 31, 2015

What’s not to love about a rich, chewy, delicious bribe you can whip up in a flash? And all the ingredients get mixed in a saucepan with a spatula—even better! This is going to be my second go-to blondie recipe (the other one is for Cinnamon Pecan Blondies, which is also found at Leite’s Culinaria). I didn’t have whole-wheat pasty flour or white or milk chocolate, so my blondies were made with all-purpose flour, 1 cup dark chocolate chips, and the optional walnuts. The blondies baked perfectly in 25 minutes in my oven and cooled in about 45 minutes. The batter may not seem enough for an 8-inch pan at first, but not to worry; just gently spread it evenly with an offset spatula. Although the blondies puff up a bit in the oven, they end up on the thin side. I recommend cutting them into 16 pieces—any smaller and you’d end up grabbing more than one anyway.

Jeanie McCallister

Jan 31, 2015

I have never made blondies, so I was curious as to how these would turn out. This blondies recipe was a cinch to put together. The total time was one hour—25 minutes to put them together and 35 minutes baking time. I used all-purpose flour, toasted walnuts, and semisweet chocolate chips (as I didn't have any white or milk chocolate chips on hand). The batter was quite stiff, so it wasn't possible to smooth it out evenly in the pan. No worries, though, as the resulting blondies were perfect! The bars had a good chewiness and were not too sweet. Sixteen squares of deliciousness!

Rebecca Sullivan

Jan 31, 2015

Quick desserts are always a good thing, and this blondies recipe is as close to a dump-and-stir recipe as it gets. The only issue I had is that they're more closely related to butterscotch brownies, which tend to be chewier, than they are blonde brownies, which tend to be cakier. That aside, these were sweet, salty, and tasty.

Jeanie McCallister

Jan 31, 2015

I've never made blondies, so I was curious as to how this blondies recipe would turn out. It was a cinch to put together. I used all-purpose flour, toasted walnuts, and semisweet chocolate chips. The batter was quite stiff, so it wasn't possible to smooth it evenly in the pan. No worries, as the result was perfect! The blondies had a good chew and were not too sweet. The recipe made 16 squares of deliciousness!

Comments

  1. As a young reader, I always found Nancy Drew just a bit too perfect, with her sweater sets, nice car, and handsome boyfriend. But Trixie Belden!–there was a girl detective who spoke to me: slightly overweight, constant runs in her stockings, and failing algebra. I think I’m going to have to develop a recipe for the Trixie Belden blondie now…..

    1. Yes, you do, Vicki! And when you do, we’d love if you’d take a second to let us know what you think…

  2. My problem with blondies is that I want them to be chewy not cakey. Do you think I could achieve this by reducing the flour to 1/2 cup? I keep trying them but never liking them. What do you think?

    1. pattyk, if you take a gander at the headnote, it says that this is a chewy (not caket) blondie. The author also gives instructions for how to make it cake! So I think you’re in the clear.

    1. pattyk, I suppose you could try that, although I wouldn’t recommend it. Baking is such a delicate science, it doesn’t take much to throw stuff off balance and I’d hate for you to end up with a gooey mess that wastes your ingredients. Our testers found these to be more chewy than cakey, so perhaps you’d want to try the recipe as-is the first time? If you really, really want to try them with less flour, I’d suggest you omit just a couple tablespoons flour for starters. Also try using a room-temperature egg as opposed to a cold egg, as this simple switch will also make the brownies more on the chewy side. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

  3. Hey, what’s the point of making blondies if you put in chocolate chips, you might as well make call them brownies! I never liked brownies I found them dry and hard, but blondies with or without nuts were perfection. Forgive this wire hanger rant but putting chocolate in it is a culinary equivalent of putting a bird on it.

    1. Huh. Growing up, we had blondies every Friday in school (along with pizza), and I swear they had chocolate chips in them. I don’t think I’ve ever seen them without!

          1. David I think I have a few years on you and my earliest recollection of versions of blondies (1950’s) were chip less and maybe with nuts. When I finally made my first batch I think it was a recipe in an old version of the Joy of Cooking and the only optional ingredient was walnuts. Also, this recipe if you add coconut may also be called (in some culinary camps) jungle bars, monkey bars, or gorilla bars. I think some of the previous commenters noted this also. If some of these gals grew up reading the Hardy boys, Nancy Drew (with her roadster) AND Trixie Belden they probably remember those days!

            1. Ann, well, I’m 54, so I remember the Hardy boys. (Loved them!) And, like I said, my only run-in with blondies was at the Joseph Case High School cafeteria. And I have to tell you, I loved those little suckers!!! And, as much as I I love to bake, I’m just not a bar person. I make brownies, but that’s about it. I think it’s time I expand my repertoire.

  4. I found these blondies to be bland, all you could taste was the brown sugar and chocolate. I definitely think the recipe needs more salt!

    1. Sure, that’ll definitely bring out the flavors more, Erin. Sorry to hear it wasn’t quite what you expected, but your solution sounds perfect. Am all for tweaking recipes to get them exactly the way you want them.

    1. Carla, I studied French and not Spanish, so I’m afraid that I can’t respond to your lovely compliment in Spanish although I can understand what it means just from the similarity between the languages (and a little help from my husband, who grew up speaking Spanish). I am so glad to hear that you and your little ones love these blondies as much as we do! Many kind thanks for letting us know!

    1. Mom, since we didn’t test the recipe that way, I’m hesitant to suggest you try it. Baking is such a precise science. Sometimes the smallest deviation in the thickness of the batter in the pan can adversely affect the resulting texture. And I’d hate for you to take a risk and be disappointed when these blondies, when made according to the recipe, are super lovely. If you have a second 8-inch baking pan, you could double the recipe but divvy the batter between the two pans.

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