Korean Steak

This Korean steak is made with rib eye steaks marinated in soy sauce, Coca Cola, sesame oil, hoisin, garlic, and scallions and then quickly grilled. A quick and easy weeknight version of beef bulgogi.

A sliced Korean steak on a rimmed baking sheet with a knife resting on the sheet and bowls of kimchi and daikon nearby.

This Korean barbecue recipe is most definitely–and defiantly–not Korean bulgogi. That’s a salty, sweet, supple, traditional Korean barbecue sensation that stipulates a specific cut of meat and a slew of other marinade ingredients. This is still salty, sweet, supple, and a barbecue sensation, though of a different, easier, yet still enticing sort. It’s also a cinch of a weeknight dinner. Just 10 minutes in the a.m. to toss together the marinade.–Renee Schettler

Korean Steak

  • Quick Glance
  • (8)
  • 20 M
  • 1 H, 10 M
  • Serves 4 to 6
4.9/5 - 8 reviews
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Ingredients


Directions

In a small bowl whisk together the soy sauce, Coke, sesame oil, and hoisin sauce. Add the garlic and scallions and whisk again.

To get the marinade on the steak, do whichever of these floats your boat: Place the steaks in a large deep dish, pour the marinade over them, and cover the dish tightly with tin foil or pour the marinade into a large resealable plastic bag, add the steaks, seal the bag, and shake them around till they’re coated in the marinade. Either way, the steaks should marinate in the fridge for up to 12 hours but no longer than that.

Pull the steaks out of the marinade, pile them on a plate, and let them rest at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes. Discard the marinade.

If you’re using the grill, fire it up. Lay the meat right on the rack and let it grill until it gets a nice char, turning once. The timing will depend on the thickness of the steaks. You just want to get a nice char going, you don’t want to cook them through. Transfer the steaks to a cooler portion of the grill until the desired doneness, about 4 minutes for medium-rare, depending on the thickness. They’re done when the meat springs back to the touch [if you have a meat thermometer, the internal temperature should be 115°F (46°C)]. You could instead bring the steaks back inside and finish it on a rack in a roasting pan in an oven preheated to 400°F (204°C)…but why turn on the oven if there’s no need?

If you’re using a cast-iron skillet or grill pan, heat it over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Sear the steak on each side for about 4 minutes, then check the steak for doneness. If you prefer anything beyond medium-rare or if you’re dealing with steaks that are larger than a pound or so each, transfer the steak and skillet to an oven preheated to 400°F(204°C) . The exact time that the steaks require in the oven depends on the thickness of the steaks. They’re done to medium-rare when the meat springs back to the touch [if you have a meat thermometer, the internal temperature should be 115°F (46°C)].

If you’re using the broiler, turn it on. Put the steaks on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet, place the baking sheet on the middle or middle-high rack, and broil the steaks to the desired doneness. The exact timing will depend on the thickness of the steaks. They’re done to medium-well when the meat springs back to the touch [if you have a meat thermometer, the internal temperature should be 115°F (46°C)].

Transfer the meat to a cutting board and let it rest for 5 minutes before thinly slicing it. Originally published August 20, 2012.

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Recipe Testers' Reviews

Let the grilling begin! What a simple and tasty marinade for a steak. Since the grill still isn’t ready to fire up just yet, I used a cast iron grill pan to do the cooking. I seared it on both sides and finished it in the oven to a nice medium-rare. It was just like I’d been outside doing it at the BBQ.

We ended up cooking and eating just 1 steak and still had leftovers for 2 lunches the next day. I will make the marinade again to use for the other steak later this week. The recipe is certainly worth doing again.

This will be a real winner in the summer when grill season starts again. I do wonder: How would this be with a Pepsi?

This is a great marinade that produces a flavorful steak–not too salty, not too sweet, and with smoky undertones. The flavors melded nicely with no one note claiming a dominant role (I was a tad concerned about the toasted sesame oil, since it can easily overwhelm).

I marinated a flank steak in a resealable plastic bag for 10 hours as the 12-hour time indicated in the recipe just didn’t work with my schedule. The weather wasn't cooperative for outdoor grilling, so the steak was grilled on a grill pan over high heat for 5 minutes per side and allowed to rest for another 5 minutes. The meat was perfectly medium rare with a nice char outside.

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Comments

    1. Thanks, Miku. We so appreciate you letting us know that it worked so well with the orange juice.

    1. I like the way you’re thinking, MasterHomeCook! Do let us know how it turns out.

    1. Generally, for steak, a little extra marinating time will make it even better, Lindsay. We’re so glad you enjoyed it.

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