Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

These oatmeal raisin cookies, made with butter, sugar, oatmeal, and plenty of raisins, are soft, chewy, and quite frankly some of the best we’ve ever had.

A stack of several oatmeal raisin cookies on a wire paddle.

Crisp on the edges, chewy in the center, and cinnamony through and through, these oatmeal raisin cookies could be kissing cousins to the classic Quaker recipe. And, in fact, they contain almost exactly the same ingredients. Still, we find these oatmeal raisin cookies to be perceptibly different from the classic. In a good, albeit sorta indefinable, way. That doesn’t mean you can’t have your own way with them, notes author Stacy Adimando. So go on, create your own riff by swapping countless less-expected stir-ins for those predictably healthful raisins, whether dried cherries, chocolate-covered raisins, toasted almonds, toffee bits, dark chocolate chunks, cranberries, chopped soft caramels, chopped chocolate-covered peanut butter cups…uh, we could blather on and on, though frankly, we’d rather hear ’bout what you choose to toss in your cookie batter.–Renee Schettler

Oatmeal Raisin Cookie

  • Quick Glance
  • (15)
  • 25 M
  • 40 M
  • Makes 24 cookies
4.8/5 - 15 reviews
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Ingredients


Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F (176°C). Line a couple baking sheets with parchment paper.

With a stand or electric mixer on medium speed, beat the butter and sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the egg and vanilla and mix a bit more.

Sift the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon into a second bowl.

Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture and run the mixer on low just until combined. Stir in the oats and raisins with a spoon. (If using blueberries, first stir the oats into the batter then carefully stir in the blueberries.) The dough may seem stiff and dry, but that’s okay.

Scoop out tablespoon-size balls of dough onto the sheets, spacing them about 2 inches apart.

Bake the cookies for 12 to 14 minutes, rotating the cookie sheets halfway through baking. (If you prefer your oatmeal raisin cookies on the chewy, gooey side of things, take them out of the oven at exactly 12 minutes.)

Tester tip: It can be tempting to leave these cookies in the oven longer—don’t fall for it. They’re best when they’re good and chewy and barely starting to crisp on the outside. Which means they’ll be a little delicate, so observe the instruction to cool them slightly on the baking sheet.

Let the cookies cool on the baking sheet for a few minutes and then transfer to a wire rack, if you can muster that sort of restraint, and enjoy. Originally published January 18, 2013.

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Recipe Testers' Reviews

This is the perfect oatmeal raisin cookie—chewy on the inside and wrapped in a slightly crisp outside. There’s just the right amount of cinnamon added.

I tried 2 variations: 1 with just raisins and another with dried cranberries, white chocolate chips, and semisweet chocolate chips. While I don’t think using cranberries and chocolate would alter the texture of the cookie, I did leave the cranberry/chocolate dough out on the counter a little longer, which made for a flatter, more crisp cookie. Thus, if you like your cookies with a chewy center, refrigerate the remaining dough while baking the initial batch. These were delicious—better than most if not all oatmeal cookie recipes!

These oatmeal raisin cookies were deliciously moist and tender and drew rave responses from family and friends. You may consider doubling the recipe, as they’ll disappear quickly.

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Comments

    1. Just went wobbly in the knees at the notion of caramel in these cookies, Kate. Minus the raisins, natch. I’ve actually also made these sans raisins or cinnamon but with walnuts and chunks of chocolate. And I’m tempted to do a sort of muesli version of them with chopped walnuts, pumpkin seeds, hazelnuts, cashews, and dried figs. I’ll trade my testing notes if you trade yours….

    1. And until you taste these, Abbe! Give them a whirl. They really are something special. (Although if you’re anything at all like me, you’ll, um, omit the cinnamon and swap chunked chocolate for raisins. But do as you will.) Kindly let us know what you think…

        1. Well, that’s innovative, Martha. I like the way you’re thinking! Although to agree would imply that I liked raisins in baked goods, which I personally do not, although I fully appreciate that many folks do….

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